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AB+BE Program Examples

Within the cross-disciplinary, systems approach to engineering, Dartmouth undergraduate majors can also pursue interests in traditional engineering fields.

At the BE level, students deepen their theoretical and analytic work while simultaneously applying their engineering skills to problems in the industrial workplace.

The program examples below show the typical foundations plus advanced courses for specific engineering fields.

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineering is the broad area of study in which engineers use an interdisciplinary approach to solve problems in the medical field, oftentimes associated with the interaction between living and non-living systems. The breadth of solution methodologies requires biomedical engineers to take a quantitative approach to system analysis in “traditional” engineering fields, while simultaneously employing a fundamental understanding of the relevant life sciences. Biomedical engineers should be prepared to design, build, test, and/or analyze biological systems, diagnostics, devices, and treatment modalities. Examples of current areas of research and education include:

  • Biomechanics (Scaling from systems to tissues, cells, and molecules)
  • Biomedical imaging
  • Biomaterials and Tissue engineering
  • Cardiovascular engineering
  • Biophotonics
  • Neural engineering
  • Orthopedic engineering
  • Biomedical instrumentation and devices

A variety of logical, interdisciplinary course sequences allow thematic approaches to the above areas (e.g. biology-based, physics-based, computer-based, mechanics/materials-based, etc.). Individuals wishing to explore biological approaches are encouraged to reference the description for Biological Engineering and perhaps enroll in ENGS 35 to gain exposure to this space.

Recommended Courses

  • ENGS 34, 35, 36
  • PHYS 19
  • MATH 22, 23
  • CHEM 41, 51/57, 52/58
  • BIOL 40
  • ENGS 56, 57/169, 59, 111, 129, 160, 165, 166, 167, 168, 170
  • As appropriate: Fundamental Electrical Engineering, Control, Mechanical Engineering, Bioengineering, Design, Computer Engineering, and Neuropsychology courses to provide tools for solving problems in the above-mentioned courses.
  • Individuals wishing to explore biological approaches are encouraged to reference the description for Biotechnology and enroll in ENGS 35 to gain exposure to this space.



Biological Engineering

Biological engineering exists at the interface of engineering, biological, and chemical sciences. This interdisciplinary field brings to bear fundamental design principles to both elucidate and modulate the function of biological systems, ranging in scale from molecular to cellular to whole organisms. The bioengineer’s toolbox may include skills such as modeling, big data analysis, genetics, process design, biochemistry, and molecular, micro, and cellular biology. By designing, engineering, and optimizing biological systems, bioengineers and biotechnologists are seeking to tackle key unmet needs in medicine, agriculture, industry, the environment, consumer markets, etc.

Recommended Courses

  • (assumes ENGS 35/160 taken as Gateway)
  • ENGS 34, 58, 59, 161, 162, 157, 158, 165
  • COSC 75, 86, 89(For topically relevant courses.)
  • CHEM 40, 41, 51/57, 52/58
  • BIOL 40, 45, 46, 47

Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering is a foundational field that is centered on designing and optimizing processes that involve the physical and chemical transformation of matter. The chemical engineer’s toolbox may include skills such as process design, heat and mass transfer, chemical transformations and kinetics, molecular and cellular biology, and others. By designing and optimizing processes, chemical engineers tackle broad problems in biological, chemical, energy, and environmental systems.

Recommended Courses

  • (assumes ENGS 36 taken as Gateway)
  • ENGS 34, 132, 150, 155, 156, 157, 158
  • CHEM 51/57, 52/58, 75, 93, 96.02, 96.07

Computer Engineering

Computer Engineering is a rapidly expanding field that is focused on designing, building, and analyzing computational and networked information processing systems. A computer engineer understands the hardware, software, and applications environment of computing systems. As a result, computer engineers must be familiar with computer architectures, networks, and applications software as well as modeling and analysis techniques for such systems including machine learning, complex systems, and artificial intelligence. Computer engineers are involved in modern systems ranging from mobile social networking applications to highly autonomous vehicles to smart sensor networks to biomedical and smart energy devices.

Recommended Courses

  • (assumes ENGS 31 taken as Gateway)
  • ENGS 32, 62, 65, 67, 68, 69, 108, 112, 115, 128, 147
  • COSC 50, 51, 55, 58, 60, 70-89

Computer Science

Students interested in computer science and engineering can pursue a Dartmouth Computer Science major modified with engineering studies, or in a Dartmouth Computer Science major with an engineering sciences minor, then continue to the Bachelor of Engineering (BE) program.

The sample programs below are examples of what can be done. Interested students should plan their programs in consultation with a professor in each department to ensure that all degree requirements are met.

Computer Science Majors Plus Engineering Sciences Minors

This sample program shows the courses for the computer science major plus engineering sciences minor and the BE program with a computer engineering concentration.

Computer Science Major

  • COSC 1: Introduction to Programming and Computation
  • COSC 10: Problem Solving via Object-Oriented Programming
  • COSC 30: Discrete Mathematics in Computer Science
  • COSC 31: Algorithms
  • COSC 50: Software Design and Implementation
  • COSC 51: Computer Architecture
  • COSC 56: Digital Electronics (same as ENGS 31) – COSC 56 fulfills particular requirements for the BE
  • COSC 71: Numerical Methods in Computation (same as ENGS 91) – COSC 71 fulfills particular requirements for the BE
  • COSC 70-89: One course
  • Two electives chosen from COSC 30-89, not used to satisfy another requirement
  • COSC 98: Senior Design and Implementation Project, or a Senior Thesis

Engineering Sciences Minor and Pre-BE Courses

  • MATH 3: Introduction to Calculus
  • MATH 8: Calculus of Functions of One and Several Variables
  • MATH 11: Multivariable Calculus for Two-Term Advanced Placement First-Year Students OR MATH 13 Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions
  • CHEM 5: General Chemistry
  • PHYS 13: Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 14: Introductory Physics II
  • ENGS 21: Introduction to Engineering
  • ENGS 22: Systems
  • ENGS 23: Distributed Systems and Fields
  • ENGS 32: Electronics: Introduction to Linear and Digital Circuits

BE (Fifth Year) Courses

  • ENGS 26: Control Theory
  • ENGS 27: Discrete and Probabilistic Systems
  • ENGS 62: Microprocessors in Engineered Systems
  • ENGS 67: Programming Parallel Systems OR ENGS 115: Parallel Computing
  • ENGS 89: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Initiation
  • ENGS 90: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Completion
  • One from: ENGS 112: Modern Information Technologies, ENGS 128: Advanced Digital System Design, OR ENGS 147: Mechatronics

Computer Science Majors Modified With Engineering

This sample program shows the courses for the computer science major modified with engineering and the BE program with a computer engineering concentration.

Modified Major

  • COSC 1: Introduction to Programming and Computation OR ENGS 20: Introduction to Scientific Computing
  • COSC 10: Problem Solving via Object-Oriented Programming
  • MATH 3: Introduction to Calculus
  • MATH 8: Calculus of Functions of One and Several Variables
  • MATH 11: Multivariable Calculus for Two-Term Advanced Placement First-Year Students OR MATH 13 Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions
  • PHYS 13: Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 14: Introductory Physics II
  • COSC 30: Discrete Mathematics in Computer Science
  • COSC 31: Algorithms
  • COSC 50: Software Design and Implementation
  • COSC 51: Computer Architecture
  • COSC 71: Numerical Methods in Computation (same as ENGS 91) – COSC 71 fulfills a particular requirement for the BE
  • One elective chosen from COSC 30-89, not used to satisfy another requirement
  • ENGS 22: Systems
  • ENGS 31: Digital Electronics
  • ENGS 32: Electronics: Introduction to Linear and Digital Circuits
  • ENGS 62: Microprocessors in Engineered Systems
  • COSC 98: Senior Design and Implementation Project, or a Senior Thesis

Pre-BE Courses

  • CHEM 5: General Chemistry
  • ENGS 21: Introduction to Engineering

BE (Fifth Year) Courses

  • ENGS 23: Distributed Systems and Fields
  • ENGS 26: Control Theory
  • ENGS 27: Discrete and Probabilistic Systems
  • ENGS 67: Programming Parallel Systems OR ENGS 115: Parallel Computing
  • ENGS 89: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Initiation
  • ENGS 90: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Completion
  • One from: ENGS 112: Modern Information Technologies, ENGS 128: Advanced Digital System Design, OR ENGS 147: Mechatronics

Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering harnesses the phenomena of electricity to develop technologies ranging from semiconductor devices to advanced communication networks. There are numerous subfields within this very broad discipline, all built on the foundations of mathematics and computer science, physical and life sciences, electromagnetics, electronics, and systems. The sample BE program reflects this breadth and begins to cultivate depth in certain areas. Graduate study at the MS and PhD level enables further specialization. Students are urged to meet with a faculty advisor to work out a plan of study within the guidelines of the sample program.

Recommended Courses

  • At least 9 courses in mathematics and natural science
    • MATH 3, 8, 13; Physics 13, 14; CHEM 5
    • MATH 22, 23, Physics 19, or other relevant mathematics and science courses
    • ENGS 92
  • At least 13.5 Engineering Science courses
    • Computer science
      • ENGS 20 (0.5 credit) or CoSc 1 and 10 (1.5 credits)
    • Core courses:
      • ENGS 21, 22, 23; two from ENGS 24-27
    • Gateway courses
      • ENGS 31, 32, and (for AB requirements) one from ENGS 30, 33-37
    • At least two mezzanine EE courses
      • ENGS 59, 60, 61, 62, 64, 68
    • At least one upper-level course
      • ENGS 110, 111, 120-129, 145, 147, 149
    • Other engineering or computer science electives, as appropriate
    • Bachelor of Engineering project
      • ENGS 89, 90

Energy Engineering

Energy is a major determinant of world events and quality of life. Energy engineering brings to bear the spectrum of engineering disciplines on challenges and opportunities involving energy, recognizing social, political, and economic contexts. This area of study aims to increase the efficiency of energy conversion, storage, transmission, and utilization, to accelerate the transition to sustainable energy sources, and to improve access to and management of energy systems. Students are encouraged to develop depth in one or more technical areas along with a broad understanding of energy technologies, systems, challenges, and opportunities.

Recommended Courses

  • Engs 25 or equivalent
  • A total of not less than three courses from:
    • Gateway courses (Engs 30 through Engs 37), appropriate to the student's interest
    • Courses having gateway courses as prerequisites, appropriate to the student's interest.
  • Two courses from:
    • Engs 173: Energy Utilization
    • Engs 174: Energy Conversion
    • Engs 175: Energy Systems

Environmental Engineering

Environmental engineering is the application of fundamental knowledge in mathematics, natural sciences (physics, chemistry, biology), and various disciplines of engineering (mostly civil, mechanical, and chemical engineering) to solve problems and address challenges at the intersection of technology with nature. The overarching objective is to protect the environment and ensure sustainability. Problems and challenges are typicaly of two types, (1) post-technology remediation or treatment, and (2) prevention or reduction of impacts by environmentally conscious design. A systems approach prevails in both types. The environmental engineer is quintessentially an interdisciplinary engineer.

Recommended Courses

  • Mathematics & Natural Sciences
    • Include 93
  • Engineering Distributive Core
    • Include 25 or 27 or both
  • Engineering Gateway Courses
    • Include 37
  • Engineering Electives
    • Recommended for concentration
      • ENGS 41, 43, 44, 46, 151, 171, 172
    • Other electives
      • ENGS 36, 51, 93 (if not included in A.), 173, 174, 175, CHEM 63, EARS 65, EARS 66, EARS 71, ENVS 30, ENVS 53

Material Science and Engineering

The study of Materials Science and Engineering relates the properties of materials --chemical, electrical, magnetic, mechanical, optical-- to their internal architecture or microstructure. In turn, the structure is related to processing-- solidification, thermal/mechanical treatment, vapor deposition, and so forth-- and to the underlying thermodynamic "driving forces" and kinetics that underlie changes in structure and hence in properties and behavior. Fundamental to the study are both qualitative and quantitative methods of microstructural analysis.

Recommended Courses

  • At least 9 courses in mathematics and natural science
    • MATH 3, 8, 13; Physics 13, 14; CHEM 5
    • MATH 23; Physics 19, 43, or other relevant mathematics and science courses
    • ENGS 93
  • At least 13.5 Engineering Science courses
    • Computer Science: ENGS 20 (0.5 credit) or COSC 1 and 10 (1.5 credits)
    • Core courses: ENGS 21,22,23; two from ENGS 24-27
  • Gateway courses
    • ENGS 31 or 32, 33
  • Mezzanine course
    • ENGS 73
  • Three upper-level courses from:
    • ENGS 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 138, 165
  • Capstone design project
    • ENGS 89,90

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers apply principles of engineering to the design, analysis, and manufacture of machines ranging from power systems, industrial equipment, and vehicles to athletic equipment and medical devices. Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest engineering disciplines, and as such, mechanical engineering programs should include mechanics, materials, thermal and fluid systems, and systems and controls. Programs should be planned in consultation with your faculty advisor.

Recommended Courses

  • At least 9 courses in mathematics and natural science
    • Math 3, 8, 13; Physics 13, 14; Chem 5
    • Math 22, 23, or other relevant mathematics and science courses
    • At least one of ENGS 91, 92, or 93
  • At least 13.5 Engineering Science courses
    • Computer science
      • ENGS 20 (0.5 credit)
    • Core courses
      • ENGS 21, 22, 23; at least two from ENGS 24-27 (24, 25, 26 recommended)
    • Gateway courses
      • ENGS 33, 34 and (for AB requirements) one from ENGS 30, 31, 32, 35-37 (31, 32, or 37 recommended)
    • At least two mezzanine Mechanical Engineering courses
      • ENGS 71, 72, 73, 76
    • At least one upper-level course
      • ENGS 130, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 154, 155, 156
    • Other engineering electives, as appropriate
      • ENGS 110, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175
    • Bachelor of Engineering project
      • ENGS 89, 90

Physics

Students interested in physics and engineering can major in engineering physics, or Dartmouth Physics major with an engineering sciences minor, then continue to the Bachelor of Engineering (BE) program.

The sample programs below are examples of what can be done. Interested students should plan their programs in consultation with a professor in each department to ensure that all degree requirements are met.

Engineering Physics Majors

This sample program shows the courses for the engineering physics major and the BE program with a mechanical engineering concentration.

Mathematics

  • MATH 3: Introduction to Calculus
  • MATH 8: Calculus of Functions of One and Several Variables
  • MATH 11: Multivariable Calculus for Two-Term Advanced Placement First-Year Students OR MATH 13: Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions
  • MATH 23: Differential Equations

Chemistry

  • CHEM 5: General Chemistry

Physics

  • PHYS 13: Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 14: Introductory Physics II
  • PHYS 19: Introductory Physics III
  • PHYS 40 (formerly 24): Quantum Physics of Matter
  • PHYS 43: Statistical Physics
  • PHYS 44: Mechanics
  • PHYS 50 (formerly 42): Introductory Quantum Mechanics

Engineering Sciences

  • ENGS 20: Introduction to Scientific Computing (may not be taken under the Non-Recording Option) – ENGS 20 may be replaced by COSC 1: Introduction to Programming and Computation AND COSC 10: Problem Solving via Object-Oriented Programming
  • ENGS 21: Introduction to Engineering
  • ENGS 22: Systems
  • ENGS 23: Distributed Systems and Fields
  • ENGS 24: Science of Materials
  • ENGS 33: Solid Mechanics
  • ENGS 76: Machine Engineering (culminating experience in the major)

BE (Fifth Year) Courses

  • ENGS 25: Introduction to Thermodynamics OR ENGS 26: Control Theory
  • ENGS 32: Electronics: Introduction to Linear and Digital Circuits OR ENGS 34: Fluid Mechanics
  • ENGS 71: Structural Analysis OR ENGS 72: Applied Mechanics: Dynamics
  • ENGS 89: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Initiation
  • ENGS 90: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Completion
  • ENGS 91: Numerical Methods in Computation
  • ENGS 142: Intermediate Solid Mechanics
  • ENGS 146: Computer-Aided Mechanical Engineering Design

Physics Majors + Engineering Sciences Minors

This sample program shows the courses for the Dartmouth physics major plus the engineering sciences minor and the BE program with an electrical engineering (electronics) concentration.

Mathematics

  • MATH 3: Introduction to Calculus
  • MATH 8: Calculus of Functions of One and Several Variables
  • MATH 11: Multivariable Calculus for Two-Term Advanced Placement First-Year Students OR MATH 13 Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions
  • MATH 23: Differential Equations

Physics

  • PHYS 13: Introductory Physics I
  • PHYS 14: Introductory Physics II
  • PHYS 19: Introductory Physics III
  • PHYS 40 (formerly 24): Quantum Physics of Matter
  • PHYS 41: Electricity and Magnetism – PHYS 41 also satisfies particular BE requirements
  • PHYS 43: Statistical Physics
  • PHYS 44: Mechanics or ENGS 72: Applied Mechanics: Dynamics
  • PHYS 48: Electronics: Introduction to Linear and Digital Circuits (same as ENGS 32) – PHYS 48 also satisfies particular BE requirements
  • PHYS 50 (formerly 42): Introductory Quantum Mechanics
  • PHYS 68: Plasma Physics OR PHYS 73: Introductory Condensed Matter Physics OR PHYS 76: Methods of Experimental Physics (culminating experience in the major)

Chemistry

  • CHEM 5: General Chemistry

Engineering Sciences Minor and Pre-BE Courses

  • ENGS 20: Introduction to Scientific Computing (may not be taken under the Non-Recording Option) – ENGS 20 may be replaced by COSC 1: Introduction to Programming and Computation AND COSC 10: Problem Solving via Object-Oriented Programming
  • ENGS 21: Introduction to Engineering
  • ENGS 22: Systems
  • ENGS 24: Science of Materials OR ENGS 27: Discrete and Probabilistic Systems
  • ENGS 31: Digital Electronics
  • ENGS 61: Intermediate Electrical Circuits

BE (Fifth Year) Courses

  • ENGS 26: Control Theory
  • ENGS 60: Introduction to Solid-State Electronic Devices OR ENGS 120: Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
  • ENGS 89: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Initiation
  • ENGS 90: Engineering Design Methodology and Project Completion
  • ENGS 92: Fourier Transforms and Complex Variables
  • ENGS 110: Signal Processing
  • ENGS 125: Power Electronics and Electromechanical Energy Conversion
  • ENGS 126: Analog Integrated Circuit Design

Questions?

For more information about AB+BE Programs, or any other related questions, contact Professor Doug Van Citters, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education.