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Meet Dartmouth’s Newest Teacher-Scholars

Dartmouth News

January 24, 2020

Dartmouth welcomes 30 new tenured or tenure-track faculty members to the College community this academic year. Like their fellow faculty members, these new professors embrace curiosity—the questions they seek to answer are at the heart of their teaching and research.

Provost Joseph Helble says their enthusiasm for inquiry and the discovery of new knowledge will have a tremendous impact on students' continued development as critical thinkers and creative leaders.

Engineering professors Jiwon Lee, Yan Li, Colin Meyer, and William Scheideler are among the new faculty, bringing expertise that includes: antibody-based therapeutics and vaccines; mechanics of advanced materials; mechanics of snow and ice systems; and materials and nanomanufacturing methods for high-performance printed and flexible devices. (Photos by Eli Burakian '00.)

Jiwon Lee

Jiwon Lee

The Ralph and Marjorie Crump Assistant Professor of Engineering

I was trained as a molecular biologist and chemical engineer with specific training and expertise in immunoengineering, immune profiling, and protein engineering. My research focuses on the human immune system and understanding how the pathogen-specific, tumor-specific, or self-reactive antibody molecules impact human health and disease. I am interested in applying this knowledge as guidance to engineer personalized antibody-based therapeutics, as well as vaccines.

On curiosity: Curiosity is what drives my research.

Yan Li

Yan Li

Assistant Professor of Engineering

My primary research interests are in the area of mechanics of advanced materials, involving multiscale/multiphysics modeling, integrated computational/experimental approaches for next-generation material design, and application of material science and solid mechanics in advanced manufacturing.

On curiosity: I believe curiosity drives innovation. I always like my students to think outside the box and be creative about problem-solving.

Colin Meyer

Colin Meyer

Assistant Professor of Engineering

From snowpack evolution to the flow of glaciers, I study the mechanics of snow and ice systems. I am particularly interested in frozen sediments beneath glaciers, the shell structure of icy satellites, and snow evolution during melting.

On curiosity: Fluid motion is beautiful, captivating, and inspiring. Seeing waves in clouds or bands on glaciers makes one curious about their formation. I promote this in the classroom through lab experiments and field excursions. As a researcher, I aim to let interesting and inspiring phenomena lead the investigations rather than techniques or methods.

William Scheideler

William Scheideler

Assistant Professor of Engineering

My research focuses on developing new materials and nanomanufacturing methods for high-performance printed and flexible devices, including low-power sensors and energy harvesting for hybrid electronics. Research in these areas serves our greater mission of sustainable nanomanufacturing for energy-efficient electronics.

On curiosity: Intellectual curiosity is the foundation of innovative experimental research. My research group develops new energy and sensing technologies, but our work is grounded in the fundamental exploration of nanoscale materials and devices. In my teaching, I hope to inspire engineering students to apply their skills of analysis and design to deeply understand the physical systems around them. Developing this physical intuition is the most powerful (and fun!) part of becoming an engineer.

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