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Dartmouth Team Invited to Share Promising Findings in Radiation Oncology at National Conference

Sep 28, 2021   |   Norris Cotton Cancer Center (NCCC)

The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has invited a research team from Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center (NCCC) to present their abstract "Imaging Radiotherapy-Induced Cherenkov Emission in Color" at an oral platform session during the ASTRO Annual Meeting in October. After peer-review, this work was selected out of 2,000 abstracts as one of the 30 winners for ASTRO's Annual Meeting Abstract Award. The abstract will also be featured in the Physics Science Highlights session at the meeting, which provides an overview of some of the top-rated medical physics abstracts being presented.

Cherenkov Conf1 crop

In this image of a "phantom" patient model, the radiation beam field can be clearly visualized.

Key personnel on this multidisciplinary project include Dartmouth Engineering PhD candidate Daniel Alexander, Assistant Professor of Engineering Petr Bruza, Professor of Engineering David Gladstone, the MacLean Professor of Engineering Brian Pogue, and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Lesley Jarvis. This work is related to the Cherenkov imaging research performed in radiation oncology.

NCCC is the only cancer center in the world that routinely uses Cherenkov imaging to monitor all radiotherapy treatments. This project involved designing a special highly sensitive camera that is capable of imaging Cherenkov emission from patients in full color.

"In our standard Cherenkov imaging research, we are able to visualize the radiation beam as it hits the patient being treated, allowing us to confirm the treatment is going as planned. This new color-sensitive imaging allows us to investigate differences in the tissues, such as blood volume and blood oxygenation level. With this technology, in the future we will be able to more accurately quantify radiation delivery and ensure safe treatment for all patients."

Daniel Alexander, Dartmouth Engineering PhD candidate

Cherenkov Conf2

A special highly sensitive camera designed by NCCC scientists is capable of imaging Cherenkov emission from patients in full color. This new color-sensitive imaging allows radiation therapists to see differences in the tissues, such as blood volume and blood oxygenation level.

Incoming Chief of Radiation Oncology, Charles R. Thomas Jr., offers his congratulations sharing, "Pound for pound, Dartmouth medical physics continues to punch its weight and is a leading source of pioneering research in this arena. This selection is an honor for the Dartmouth team!"

Link to source:

https://cancer.dartmouth.edu/stories/article/dartmouth-research-team-invited-share-abstract-promising-findings-radiation-oncology-national

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