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Engineering Courses

Undergraduate

Graduate

Courses for Majors/Minors

    Engineering Sciences Prerequisite

    Along with mathematics, physics, and chemistry, engineering students need basic skills in computing.

  • ENGS 20
    Introduction to Scientific Computing

    Description

    May not be taken under the Non-Recording Option This course introduces concepts and techniques for creating computational solutions to problems in engineering and science. The essentials of computer programming are developed using the C and Matlab languages, with the goal of enabling the student to use the computer effectively in subsequent courses. Programming topics include problem decomposition, control structures, recursion, arrays and other data structures, file I/O, graphics, and code libraries. Applications will be drawn from numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, root finding, matrix operations, searching and sorting, simulation, and data analysis. Good programming style and computational efficiency are emphasized. Although no previous programming experience is assumed, a significant time commitment is required. Students planning to pursue the engineering sciences major are advised to take ENGS 20. Students considering the computer science major or majors modified with computer science should take COSC 1 and COSC 10. Enrollment is limited to 50 students.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 and prior or concurrent enrollment in MATH 8

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


  • Common Core Courses

    Common core courses emphasize an integrated approach to problem solving and systems analysis.

  • ENGS 21
    Introduction to Engineering

    Description

    The student is introduced to engineering through participation, as a member of a team, in a complete design project. The synthesis of many fields involving the laws of nature, mathematics, economics, management, and communication is required in the project. Engineering principles of analysis, experimentation, and design are applied to a real problem, from initial concept to final recommendations. The project results are evaluated in terms of technical and economic feasibility and social significance. Lectures are directed toward the problem, with experiments designed by students as the need develops. Enrollment is limited to 64 students. Priority will be given to sophomores.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ryan M. Chapman


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Brittany Goods


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


  • ENGS 22
    Systems

    Description

    The student is introduced to the techniques of modeling and analyzing lumped systems of a variety of types, including electrical, mechanical, reacting, fluid, and thermal systems. System input will be related to output through ordinary differential equations, which will be solved by analytical and numerical techniques. Systems concepts such as time constant, natural frequency, and damping factor are introduced. The course includes computer and laboratory exercises to enhance the students’ understanding of the principles of lumped systems. Students will develop the ability to write MATLAB code. Enrollment is limited to 50 students.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    MATH 13, PHYS 14, and ENGS 20

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ulf L. Österberg


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Helene Seroussi


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John Zhang


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


  • ENGS 23
    Distributed Systems and Fields

    Description

    A study of the fundamental properties of distributed systems and their description in terms of scalar and vector fields. After a summary of vector-field theory, the formulation of conservation laws, source laws, and constitutive equations is discussed. Energy and force relations are developed and the nature of potential fields, wave fields, and diffusion fields is examined. A survey of elementary transport processes is given. Particular attention is given to the relation between the description of systems in terms of discrete and distributed parameters. Applications are chosen primarily from fluid mechanics, electromagnetic theory, and heat transfer. Includes a set of laboratories.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ulf L. Österberg


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ulf L. Österberg


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ulf L. Österberg


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


  • Distributive Core Courses

    Distributive core courses address basic concepts of engineering and help students make informed decisions about their eventual engineering specialties.

  • ENGS 24
    Science of Materials

    Description

    An introduction to the structure/property relationships, which govern the mechanical, the thermal, and the electrical behavior of solids (ceramics, metals, and polymers). Topics include atomic, crystalline, and amorphous structures; X-ray diffraction; imperfections in crystals; phase diagrams; phase transformations; elastic and plastic deformation; free electron theory and band theory of solids; electrical conduction in metals and semi-conductors. The laboratory consists of an experimental project selected by the student and approved by the instructor.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    PHYS 14 and CHEM 5

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu

    Christopher G. Levey


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu

    Christopher G. Levey


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu

    Christopher G. Levey


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost

    Daniel C. Cullen


  • ENGS 25
    Introduction to Thermodynamics

    Description

    The fundamental concepts and methods of thermodynamics are developed around the first and second laws. The distinctions between heat, work, and energy are emphasized. Common processes for generating work, heat, or refrigeration or changing the physical or chemical state of materials are analyzed. The use of thermodynamic data and auxiliary functions such as entropy, enthalpy, and free energy are integrated into the analysis. The numerous problems show how theoretical energy requirements and the limitations on feasible processes can be estimated. Enrollment is limited to 60 students.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 13, PHYS 13, ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Lee R. Lynd


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Lee R. Lynd


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Lee R. Lynd


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


  • ENGS 26
    Control Theory

    Description

    The course treats the design of analog, lumped parameter systems for the regulation or control of a plant or process to meet specified criteria of stability, transient response, and frequency response. The basic theory of control system analysis and design is considered from a general point of view. Mathematical models for electrical, mechanical, chemical, and thermal systems are developed. Feedback-control system design procedures are established, using root-locus and frequency response methods.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Laura E. Ray


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Laura E. Ray


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


  • ENGS 27
    Discrete and Probabilistic Systems

    Description

    This course is an introduction to probabilistic methods for modeling, analyzing, and designing systems. Mathematical topics include the fundamentals of probability, random variables and common probability distributions, basic queueing theory, and stochastic simulation. Applications, drawn from a variety of engineering settings, may include measurement and noise, information theory and coding, computer networks, diffusion, fatigue and failure, reliability, statistical mechanics, ecology, decision making, and robust design.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 8 and either ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10. PHYS 13 or CHEM 5 recommended.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


  • ENGS 28
    Embedded Systems

    Description

    A vast number of everyday products, from home appliances to automobiles, are controlled by small embedded computers, invisible to the user. This course introduces, at an elementary level, the three basic components of all such embedded systems: sensors to measure the physical environment, actuators to produce the system behavior, and a microcontroller that processes the sensor data and controls the actuators. Topics: microcontroller architecture and programming, writing embedded software, analog- to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, interfacing sensors and actuators, and data communication. There are daily in-class design exercises and weekly labs. Enrollment for this initial offering is limited to 20 students.
    Includes Lab

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


  • Gateway Courses

    Gateway courses introduce students to specific engineering disciplines and help them shape their programs around their interests.

  • ENGS 30
    Biological Physics

    Description

    Introduction to the principles of physics and engineering applied to biological problems. Topics include the architecture of biological cells, molecular motion, entropic forces, enzymes and molecular machines, and nerve impulses. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

    Prerequisites

    CHEM 5, PHYS 13 and PHYS 14 (or equivalent). PHYS 14 (or equivalent) may be taken concurrently. Students with strong quantitative skills who have taken PHYS 3 and PHYS 4 can enroll with permission of the instructor.

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 30

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 31
    Digital Electronics

    Description

    This course teaches classical switching theory, including Boolean algebra, logic minimization, algorithmic state machine abstractions, and synchronous system design. This theory is then applied to digital electronic design. Techniques of logic implementation, from small scale integration (SSI) through application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), are encountered. There are weekly laboratory exercises for the first part of the course, followed by a digital design project in which the student designs and builds a large system of his or her choice. In the process, computer-aided design (CAD) and construction techniques for digital systems are learned. Enrollment is limited to 60 students.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 56

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


  • ENGS 32
    Electronics: Introduction to Linear and Digital Circuits

    Description

    Principles of operation of semiconductor diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors, and their application in rectifier, amplifier, waveshaping, and logic circuits. Basic active-circuit theory. Introduction to integrated circuits: the operational amplifier and comparator, to include practical considerations for designing circuits with off-the shelf components. Emphasis on breadth of coverage of low-frequency linear and digital networks, as well as on high order passive and active filter design. Laboratory exercises permit "hands-on" experience in the analysis and design of simple electronic circuits. The course is designed for two populations: a) those desiring a single course in basic electronics, and b) those that need the fundamentals necessary for further study of active circuits and systems.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, or equivalent background in basic circuit theory

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 048

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


  • ENGS 33
    Solid Mechanics

    Description

    After a brief review of the concepts of rigid body statics, the field equations describing the static behavior of deformable elastic solids are developed. The stress and strain tensors are introduced and utilized in the development. Exact and approximate solutions of the field equations are used in the study of common loading cases, including tension/compression, bending, torsion, pressure, and combinations of these. In the laboratory phase of the course, various methods of experimental solid mechanics are introduced. Some of these methods are used in a project in which the deformation and stress in an actual load system are determined and compared with theoretical predictions. The course includes a series of computer exercises designed to enhance the student's understanding of the principles of solid mechanics.
    Includes Lab
    Design Credit

    Prerequisites

    MATH 13 and PHYS 13

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Yan Li


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Yan Li


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Yan Li


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Yan Li


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


  • ENGS 34
    Fluid Mechanics

    Description

    We interact with fluids every day. From complex systems such as cars, airplanes, and chemical plants, to simple devices like a bike pump, our world is filled with engineering applications that make use of the principles of fluid mechanics. This course surveys the fundamental concepts, phenomena, and methods in fluid mechanics, as well as their application in engineered systems and in nature. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy, as well as on the empirical knowledge essential to the understanding of many fluid dynamic phenomena. Examples are drawn from mechanical, chemical, civil, environmental, biomedical, and aerospace engineering.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


  • ENGS 35
    Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering

    Description

    A consideration of the engineering and scientific basis for using cells or their components in engineered systems. Central topics addressed include kinetics and reactor design for enzyme and cellular systems; fundamentals, techniques, and applications of recombinant DNA technology; and bioseparations. Additional lectures will provide an introduction to metabolic modeling as well as special topics. The course is designed to be accessible to students with both engineering and life-science backgrounds. This course has a graduate section, ENGS 160. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3, CHEM 5, BIOL 12 or BIOL 13 or permission

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Required on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


  • ENGS 36
    Chemical Engineering

    Description

    This course will expose students to the fundamental principles of chemical engineering and the application of these principles to a broad range of systems. In the first part of the course, aspects of chemical thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and transport phenomena will be addressed. These principles will then be applied to a variety of systems including industrial, environmental, and biological examples

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, ENGS 25 and CHEM 5

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


  • ENGS 37
    Introduction to Environmental Engineering

    Description

    A survey of the sources, measurement techniques, and treatment technologies relating to environmental pollution resulting from the activities of humans. The course will be technology-focused, but will also touch on topics related to the implementation of technology in the real world such as public perception, policy and legislation, and choosing between technological alternatives. Technological and other issues will be addressed relating to water pollution, air pollution, solid wastes, and the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. Consideration of each area will include general background and key concepts, detailed design examples of importance in the area, and case studies/current topics. The course will include guest lecturers.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 and CHEM 5, or equivalent, or permission

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


  • Upper-Level Courses

    Upper-level courses allow majors and minors to acquire depth in their chosen engineering fields.

  • ENGS 41
    Sustainability and Natural Resource Management

    Description

    Natural resources sustain human productivity. Principles of scientific resource management are established, including mathematical model development based on material balances and decision making based on dynamical and stochastic systems. Three generic categories of resource are analyzed: exhaustible, living, and renewable. In the first category, we emphasize the life-cycle of exploitation including exhaustion, exploration and substitution. In the living category, we explore population dynamics under natural and harvested regimes, for fisheries, fowl and forests. The renewable case of water is treated in terms of quantity and quality. Finally, air quality management is considered through the lens of assimilative capacity. Throughout, the intersection of natural processes and economic incentives is explored with dynamical systems theory, computer simulations, and optimization techniques. Case studies illustrate contemporary management problems and practices.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 23 or ENGS 22, and ENGS 37

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


  • ENGS 43
    Environmental Transport and Fate

    Description

    Introduction to the movement and transformation of contaminants released in soils, rivers, and the atmosphere. Fundamentals of advective-dispersive reactive transport, including approaches for assessing and parameterizing the complex heterogeneity and anisotropy of natural media. Analysis of mixing processes that lead to dispersion at larger spatial and temporal scales. Basic principles are illustrated by application to real world examples of groundwater, river, and atmospheric pollution.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 8 or equivalent and either ENGS 37 or EARS 16

    Cross Listed Courses

    EARS 66.01

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 44
    Sustainable Design

    Description

    This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the principles of design for sustainability, with emphasis on the built environment. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and a major design project, students learn to design buildings and other infrastructure with low to no impact on the environment. Emphasis is on creative thinking, strategies for managing the complexity of the product life cycle of the infrastructure, and the thorough integration of human and economic aspects in the design. Homework and project activities provide practice in relevant engineering analysis. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 21 and ENGS 22 or SART 65

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Karolina Kawiaka


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Karolina Kawiaka


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Karolina Kawiaka


  • ENGS 46
    Advanced Hydrology

    Description

    A survey of advanced methods used to analyze the occurrence and movement of water in the natural environment. The watershed processes controlling the generation of runoff and streamflow are highlighted and used to explore the transport and fate of sediment and contaminants in watersheds. Throughout the course the ideas and concepts are explored through the primary literature, with emphasis given to methods of observation, measurement, data analysis, and prediction.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 and EARS 16 or 33 or BIO 53 or ENGS 43 or permission of instructor

    Cross Listed Courses

    EARS 76

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 50
    Software Design and Implementation

    Description

    Techniques for building large, reliable, maintainable, and understandable software systems. Topics include UNIX tools and filters, programming in C, software testing, debugging, and teamwork in software development. Concepts are reinforced through a small number of medium-scale programs and one team programming project.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    COSC 10 or equivalent

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 050

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


  • ENGS 52
    Introduction to Operations Research

    Description

    Basic concepts of optimization are introduced as aids in systematic decision making in engineering contexts. Deterministic optimization is developed in the form of linear and integer programming and their extensions. Probabilistic models are introduced in terms of Markov chains, queuing and inventory theory, and stochastic simulation. The course emphasizes the application of these methods to the design, planning, and operation of complex industrial and public systems.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 8 and MATH 22 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


  • ENGS 56
    Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

    Description

    This course will survey applications of engineering principles to medical diagnosis/treatment of disease, monitoring/measurement of physiological function, and rehabilitation/replacement of body dysfunction. Case studies will be used to highlight how engineering has advanced medical practice and understanding. Examples will be drawn from bioinstrumentation, bioelectricity, biotransport, biomaterials, and biomechanics. While investigations will focus primarily on the engineering aspects of related topics, issues surrounding patient safety, public policy and regulation, animal experimentation, etc., will be discussed as appropriate.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, PHYS 13 and PHYS 14 (PHYS 14 may be taken concurrently)

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    P. Jack Hoopes


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    P. Jack Hoopes

    John Zhang


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    P. Jack Hoopes

    John Zhang


  • ENGS 57
    Intermediate Biomedical Engineering

    Description

    The basic biomedical engineering concepts introduced in ENGS 56 will serve as the foundation for exploring technology in a clinical environment. The specific clinical setting to be explored will be the operating room (OR). This course will introduce a variety of surgical procedures and technologies from an engineering perspective. Areas of focus will include patient monitoring, biophysical tissue properties, general surgical instrumentation, tissue cutting and binding technologies, and optical visualization technologies. In addition, state-of-the-art procedures employing image-guided, minimally invasive, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted surgical technologies will be discussed. The first half of the term will include weekly seminars presented by surgeons describing a particular surgical procedure, the technologies currently used and a surgeon’s “wish-list”. During the second half of the term, students will undertake a design project aimed at developing a technology that addresses a specific need within the OR. Enrollment is limited to 18 students.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 and ENGS 56 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


  • ENGS 58
    Introduction to Protein Engineering

    Description

    Engineered biomolecules are powering an array of innovations in biotechnology, and this course will familiarize students with key developments in the field. An overview of foundational principles will cover concepts such as the central dogma of biology, atomic scale forces in protein structures, and protein structure-function relationships. Strategies for modifying protein structures will be surveyed, with a particular emphasis on genetic techniques. The development of proteins with practical utility will be highlighted using case studies.
    Culminating Experience
    Design Credit

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 35 or CHEM 41

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Karl E. Griswold


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Karl E. Griswold


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Karl E. Griswold


  • ENGS 59
    Basic Biological Circuit Engineering

    Description

    This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the design, modeling, and experimental implementation of synthetic bio-molecular circuits in living cells at an undergraduate level. Simple but sophisticated synthetic biological circuits will be implemented and tested in microbial cells in the laboratory including those involving molecular amplification, regulatory feedback loops with biological nonlinearities, and robust analog circuits. Computer aided design, modeling, and simulation will use CADENCE, an industry standard electronic circuit design laboratory tool. It will show them how to design, model, and fit actual experimental biological data such that engineering circuit theory and biological experiment agree.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22 or Permission of Instructor. Experience in Molecular Biology is useful (e.g. ENGS 35, BIOL 45, & BIOL 46 or equivalent) but not necessary.

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


  • ENGS 60
    Introduction to Solid-State Electronic Devices

    Description

    In this course the physical and operational principles behind important electronic devices such as the solar cell and transistor are introduced. Semiconductor electron and hole concentrations and carrier transport are discussed. Carrier generation and recombination including optical absorption and light emission are covered. P-N junction operation and its application to diodes, solar cells, LEDs, and photodiodes is developed. The field-effect transistor (FET) and bipolar junction transistor (BJT) are then discussed and their terminal operation developed. Application of transistors to bipolar and CMOS analog and digital circuits is introduced. The course is primarily intended for students interested in electronics, including digital, analog, power and energy, both at component and integrated circuit levels. The course may also be useful to students interested in electronic materials, device microfabrication and communications.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Eric R. Fossum


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric R. Fossum


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric R. Fossum


  • ENGS 61
    Intermediate Electrical Circuits

    Description

    This course will build on ENGS 32, providing a foundation for transistor- level analog and digital circuit design. The course will start with an introduction to the Semiconductor Industry and how it has dramatically altered the modern way of life, resulting in diverse technologies from the iPhone and Facebook to LED lighting and electric transportation. This will lead into basic semiconductor theory and CMOS device models, two-port linearized models, and finally single- and multi-stage amplifiers with applications motivated by wireless communications and biomedical instrumentation. The second half of the class will focus on digital circuits. Topics will include designing and optimizing complex static CMOS in terms of energy, delay, and area for computational blocks and memory arrays (SRAM, DRAM, and FLASH). The class will have weekly labs and a final project that will utilize modern computeraided design tools (Cadence). The course will prepare the student for advanced study of highly integrated electrical circuits.
    Includes Lab
    Culminating Experience

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 32

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


  • ENGS 62
    Microprocessors in Engineered Systems

    Description

    Microprocessors and microcomputers are central components in an ever-increasing number of consumer, industrial, and scientific products. This course extends the experimental design methodology developed in ENGS 50 to state-of-the-art System-on-Chip (SoC) architectures and explores the principles behind advanced embedded systems. SoC devices are highly-integrated components that combine high-performance multi-core processors, with Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and a broad selection of industry standard peripheral interfaces -- all within a single chip. Students are introduced to concepts of event-driven finites state machines, peripheral interfacing via the processor and the FPGA fabric, and advanced hardware-software co-design tools that speed the design process. The course is based on a sequence of laboratory projects that incorporate SoC programming practices and debugging strategies, interrupt handling, FPGA and bus interfaces, and attached peripheral devices.
    Includes Lab
    Culminating Experience

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 50

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


  • ENGS 64
    Engineering Electromagnetics

    Description

    Conceptual development, techniques and engineering applications in electrostatics, magnetostatics and magnetic induction; displacement current and Maxwell’s equations; transmission line analysis; propagation, reflection, refraction and dispersion of electromagnetic waves.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Fridon Shubitidze


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Fridon Shubitidze


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Fridon Shubitidze


  • ENGS 65
    Engineering Software Design

    Description

    As a successor to ENGS 20, this course covers intermediate topics in programming and software design with an emphasis on engineering applications. Students will learn software design principles and basic data structures. Topics covered will include object-oriented design, user interface design, lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, hash tables, and simulation. Students will learn techniques for developing maintainable, extensible, and understandable software.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: L
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: L
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


  • ENGS 66
    Discrete Mathematics in Computer Science

    Description

    This course integrates discrete mathematics with algorithms and data structures, using computer science applications to motivate the mathematics. It covers logic and proof techniques, induction, set theory, counting, asymptotics, discrete probability, graphs, and trees.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10 or advanced placement

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 030

    Distribution Code

    QDS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Sebastiaan Joosten


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 67
    Programming Parallel Systems

    Description

    Multi-core processors are now ubiquitous in most personal computers. These are the fundamental computer-engineering building blocks for high-performance servers, blade farms, and cloud computing. In order to utilize these devices in large systems they must be interconnected through networking and collectively programmed. This hands-on system-engineering course offers students the opportunity to explore problem-solving techniques on a high-performance multi-computer containing multi-core processors. The course involves weekly programming laboratories that teach POSIX thread, UDP and TCP network, and MPI style programming techniques. These techniques are explored in the context of scalable problem solving methods applied to typical problems in science and engineering ranging from client-server sensing and data repositories, to numerical methods, gaming and decision support. All laboratories will be conducted in the C programming language and proficiency in C is required. Enrollment is limited to 30 students.
    Includes Lab
    Culminating Experience

    Prerequisites

    Prerequisite: ENGS 20 or COSC 50

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 063

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 68
    Introduction to Communication Systems

    Description

    This course provides an introduction to communication systems. The focus is on the deterministic aspects of analog and digital systems. The student is introduced to modeling and analyzing signals in the time and frequency domains. Modulation techniques are addressed as well as sampling, multiplexing, line coding, and pulse shaping. Recent developments in communication systems are briefly discussed.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, ENGS 27 and ENGS 92.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Markus E. Testorf


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Markus E. Testorf


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Markus E. Testorf


  • ENGS 69
    Smartphone Programming

    Description

    This course teaches students how to design, implement, test, debug and publish smartphone applications. Topics include development environment, phone emulator, key programming paradigms, UI design including views and activities, data persistence, messaging and networking, embedded sensors, location based services (e.g., Google Maps), cloud programming, and publishing applications. Concepts are reinforced through a set of weekly programming assignments and group projects. Enrollment is limited to 50 students.

    Prerequisites

    COSC 10

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 065

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Xing-Dong Yang


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 71
    Structural Analysis

    Description

    An introduction to the behavior of structural systems (including examples of buildings, space structures, and mechanical systems), with an emphasis on modeling and approximating behavior. Classical and computational analysis methods for structural load flow through basic three-dimensional structures; methods of approximating the response of planar structures; methods of determining deformations in planar, statically determinate structure; actions and deformations in statically indeterminate structures, using both flexibility/compatibility methods and stiffness/equilibrium methods (including an introduction to matrix methods). A structural system of choice will be redesigned to improve performance.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10 and ENGS 33

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


  • ENGS 72
    Applied Mechanics: Dynamics

    Description

    The fundamentals of dynamics with emphasis on their application to engineering problems. Newtonian mechanics including kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies, work, energy, impulse, and momentum. Intermediate topics will include Lagrange's equations, energy methods, Euler's equations, rigid body dynamics, and the theory of small oscillations.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Michael A. Kokko


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Michael A. Kokko


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Michael A. Kokko


  • ENGS 73
    Materials Processing and Selection

    Description

    In this course the basic concepts of materials science introduced in ENGS 24 are applied to a variety of materials problems and processes. The course will treat processes and principles relevant to both mechanical and electrical engineering applications. Topics include solidification and crystal growth, joining and bonding techniques, deformation processing, surface coatings and thin film deposition, polymer processing, composite materials, magnetic and dielectric materials, powder metallurgy and ceramics processing, materials selection, failure processes, and quality control. The course will involve laboratory exercises and field trips to local industry. Materials applications will be considered on a case study basis, including aerospace and automotive structures, consumer goods, high performance sports equipment, electric components, VLSI circuit fabrication and packaging.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 and ENGS 33 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost


  • ENGS 75
    Product Design

    Description

    A laboratory course on human-centered product design. A series of design projects form the vehicle for exploring creative strategies for optimizing product design for human use. The course focus includes need-finding, concept development, iterative modeling, prototyping and testing. The goal is synthesis of technical requirements with aesthetic and human concerns. Includes presentations by visiting professional designers. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 21 or ENGS 89

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


  • ENGS 76
    Machine Engineering

    Description

    An introduction to the analysis and synthesis of mechanical components and systems. Lecture topics focus on design and analysis of mechanical components subject to static and fatigue loading conditions, deformation, and buckling. Power transmission shafting, bearings, and gears will be studied in detail. A survey of design requirements for other components — springs, screws, belts, clutches, brakes, roller chains, and welded and riveted connections — will be provided. The class includes laboratory sessions for developing practical skills in design fabrication. A term project emphasizes the synthesis of a working machine to complete a specified task. The project involves the design or selection of components studied, and includes fabrication and demonstration of the machine. Solid modeling software is used as a design tool. Enrollment is limited to 25 students.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 21, ENGS 33, and proficiency with solid modeling software

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Required on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


  • ENGS 84
    Reading Course

    Description

    Advanced undergraduates occasionally arrange with a Thayer faculty member a reading course in a subject not occurring in the regularly scheduled curriculum. This course can only be elected once and either ENGS 84 or ENGS 85 may be used toward the Engineering Sciences major, but not both.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of the department chair.

    Notes

    (Proposed courses should include a full syllabus, resources and student evaluation methods and must be submitted for approval prior to the end of the term preceding the term in which the course will be taken.)

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


  • ENGS 85
    Special Topics in Engineering Sciences

    Description

    From time to time a section of ENGS 85 may be offered in order to provide an advanced course in a topic which would not otherwise appear in the curriculum. This course can only be elected once and either ENGS 84 or 85 may be used toward the Engineering Sciences major, but not both.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of the department chair
  • ENGS 86
    Independent Project

    Description

    An individual research or design project carried out under the supervision of a member of Thayer School faculty member. Students electing this course will be expected to carry out preliminary reading during the preceding term. A major written report and oral presentation will be submitted at the completion of the course. ENGS 86 may be counted as an elective in the major if ENGS 89 is taken as the culminating experience. Only one of either ENGS 86 or ENGS 88 may be used in satisfaction of the combined A.B. major and B.E. degree requirements.
    Culminating Experience

    Prerequisites

    Senior standing in the Engineering Sciences major or Bachelor of Engineering standing and permission of the department chair is required.

    Notes

    (One-page proposal submission required and must be submitted for approval prior to the end of the term preceding the term in which the course will be taken.)

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


  • ENGS 87
    Undergraduate Investigations

    Description

    An original investigation in a phase of science or engineering under the supervision of a member of Thayer School faculty member. Students electing the course will be expected to carry out preliminary reading during the preceding term and to meet weekly with the staff member supervising the investigation. The course is open to qualified undergraduates with the consent of the department chair, and it may be elected more than once. A report describing the details of the investigation must be filed with the department chair and approved at the completion of the course.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of the department chair.

    Notes

    (One-page proposal submission required and must be submitted for approval prior to the end of the term preceding the term in which the course will be taken.)

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


  • ENGS 88
    Honors Thesis

    Description

    Honors version of ENGS 86. A course normally elected by honors students in one term of the senior year. The student will conduct a creative investigation suitable to the major subject under the supervision and guidance of a member of Thayer School faculty member. Students electing this course will be expected to begin the project work at least one term prior to electing ENGS 88 and may choose to conduct the preliminary investigation under ENGS 87. A major written report and oral presentation will be submitted at the completion of the course. Only one of either ENGS 86 or ENGS 88 may be used in satisfaction of the combined A.B. major and B.E. degree requirements.
    Culminating Experience

    Prerequisites

    Permission of the chair of the Honors program.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Individualized Study

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


  • ENGS 89
    Engineering Design Methodology and Project Initiation

    Description

    This course explores elements of the engineering design process as a means of enhancing student ability in problem definition, development and evaluation of creative alternatives, application and methods of technical and economic analysis, identification and application of ethical and legal constraints, and effective presentation of technical information. Design projects are developed from specifications submitted by industry and other organizations and are pursued over the course of two quarters as a team project (ENGS 89/90). Written and oral proposals and progress reports are required for the design project during the term. A project advisor is required for each design team to serve as a consultant to the team's efforts. ENGS 89 is the first unit of a two-term course sequence (ENGS 89/90) that must be taken consecutively.
    Culminating Experience

    Prerequisites

    Prior to enrollment in ENGS 89, at least six engineering courses must be completed. These include ENGS 21 plus five additional courses numbered 22 to 76 (excluding 75) and 91 and above.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote lectures, but optional on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


  • ENGS 90
    Engineering Design Methodology and Project Completion

    Description

    This course is the second unit in the two-course team engineering design sequence ENGS 89/90. The objective of the course is to develop the students' professional abilities by providing a realistic project experience in engineering analysis, design, and development. Students continue with the design teams formed in ENGS 89 to complete their projects. Design teams are responsible for all aspects of their respective projects: science, innovation, analysis, experimentation, economic decisions and business operations, planning of projects, patents, and relationships with clients. Mid-term and final oral presentations and written reports are required. A faculty member is assigned to each design team to serve as consultant to the team's efforts.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 89

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Required on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


  • ENGS 91
    Numerical Methods in Computation

    Description

    A study and analysis of important numerical and computational methods for solving engineering and scientific problems. The course will include methods for solving linear and nonlinear equations, doing polynomial interpolation, evaluating integrals, solving ordinary differential equations, and determining eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. The student will be required to write and run computer programs. ENGS 91 may not be used by mathematics or computer science majors in partial satisfaction of the distributive requirement.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10; ENGS 22 or MATH 23, or equivalent

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 071

    Distribution Code

    QDS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


  • ENGS 92
    Fourier Transforms and Complex Variables

    Description

    Survey of a number of mathematical methods of importance in engineering and physics with particular emphasis on the Fourier transform as a tool for modeling and analysis. Orthogonal function expansions, Fourier series, discrete and continuous Fourier transforms, generalized functions and sampling theory, complex functions and complex integration, Laplace, Z, and Hilbert transforms. Computational Fourier analysis, applications to linear systems, waves, and signal processing.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 46 or ENGS 22 and ENGS 23 or the equivalent

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 070

    Distribution Code

    QDS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Markus E. Testorf


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Markus E. Testorf


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Markus E. Testorf


  • ENGS 93
    Statistical Methods in Engineering

    Description

    The application of statistical techniques and concepts to maximize the amount and quality of information resulting from experiments. After a brief introductory summary of fundamental concepts in probability and statistics, topics considered will include probability distributions, sampling distributions, estimation and confidence intervals for parameters of statistical distributions, hypothesis testing, design and analysis of variance for single and multiple-factor experiments, regression analysis, estimation and confidence intervals for parameters of non-statistical models, and statistical quality control.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 13 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    QDS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vikrant S. Vaze


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vikrant S. Vaze


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vikrant S. Vaze


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


  • ENGG 113
    Image Visualization and Analysis

    Description

    The goal of this course is to introduce graduate level and senior undergraduate students who are working in imaging research to image processing and visualization in 3D using advanced libraries and fully functional software development framework. The most widely used open source software tools for medical image analysis and visualization will be used as the platform: The Insight Registration Segmentation Toolkit (ITK), the Visualization Toolkit (VTK), OpenCV, Qt, and CMake. ITK is an open-source, widely adopted, cross-platform system that provides developers with an extensive suite of software tools for image analysis, including fundamental algorithms for image segmentation and registration. VTK is an open-source, widely adopted, software system for 3D computer graphics, modeling, image processing, volume rendering, scientific visualization, and information visualization. The student will gain understanding of the working of all subroutines and practical application implementing these routines into customized workflow. The course will also introduce the use of OpenCV for applying computer vision and machine learning algorithms to biomedical images and data. Moreover, a full software development environment will be employed to create release-quality applications. This will include the use of source version control to track code changes and bugs, Qt for user interface development, CMake for development environment control, and Visual Studio C++ for the coding environment (Python is also permitted for students with substantial experience working with the language). This state of the art forms the basis for most medical visualization software used today, and students will learn the use of these tools and complete required exercises and projects, with an emphasis on real-world clinical applications.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 65 or Permission of the Instructor

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Michael Jermyn