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Engineering Courses

Undergraduate

Graduate

Courses

  • ENGS 1
    Mathematical Concepts in Engineering

    Description

    This course introduces prospective engineering students to mathematical concepts relevant in engineering while emphasizing the solving of engineering problems rather than mathematical derivations and theory. All topics are driven by engineering applications taken directly from core engineering courses. The course includes hands-on laboratory exercises as well as a thorough introduction to Matlab.

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 10
    The Science and Engineering of Digital Imaging

    Description

    Recent advances in electrical and computer engineering, computer science and applied mathematics have made remarkable digital imaging systems possible. Such systems are affecting everyone today — from eyewitness documentation of social and political events to health care to entertainment to scientific discovery. This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts underlying a diverse and representative collection of modern digital imaging systems including cell phone cameras, medical imaging systems, space telescopes, computer games and animated movies. Specific attention will be paid to the scientific principles and engineering challenges underlying optics, computer processing chips, image processing software and algorithms, data compression and communication, and digital sensors as well as the basic principles of human vision and cognition. Students will explore and learn the basic science and technology through a combination of in-class lectures and active hands-on experimentation with digital cameras, image processing software and digital video systems. Students will participate in a course-long group project that demonstrates their understanding of and ability to harness these new technologies. Students will be expected to have access to an entry-level digital camera, either standalone or attached to a cell phone or tablet computer. Enrollment limited to 75 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 11
    The Way Things Work - A Visual Introduction to Engineering

    Description

    Students will explore and compare engineered solutions to challenges or problems in the world around them. They will sketch and build models to help them understand and communicate. After being exposed to some basic engineering principles they will be asked to further investigate specific challenges and possible engineering solutions. What is the problem or need? What are some possible engineered solutions? What are the pros and cons of the different solutions? How could these solutions be improved? They will communicate their findings visually to the class, to the Thayer community, and beyond.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    David A. Macaulay


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    David A. Macaulay


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    David A. Macaulay


  • ENGS 12
    Design Thinking

    Description

    A foundation course on the cognitive strategies and methodologies that form the basis of creative design practice. Design thinking applies to innovation across the built environment, including the design of products, services, interactive technology, environments, and experiences. Topics include design principles, human need-finding, formal methodologies, brainstorming, heuristics, thinking by analogy, scenario building, visual thinking, and study of experienced thinkers. Weekly projects and exercises in a variety of media provide practice and development of students' personal creative abilities. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Rafe H. Steinhauer


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


  • ENGS 13
    Virtual Medicine and Cybercare

    Description

    There is a revolution in technology that is occurring in healthcare. This new technology will dramatically change how healthcare is delivered in the future. This course will cover topics related to the virtual human, created from bits. This will include virtual reality, augmented reality and datafusion, computer simulation, advanced 3D and 4D imaging techniques, the operating room of the future, minimally invasive surgery, space medicine, tele-operations, tele-medicine and tele-surgery, Internet 2 and cyberspace, artificial intelligence and intelligent agents applied to medicine, and the National Library of Medicine virtual human project. We will also discuss the FDA approval of computer simulators, robotic surgeons, and the ethics of robots doing surgery. In addition, we will discuss the medical library of the future, teleconferencing, and the use of interactive media in healthcare education. We will also discuss computerized patient records (CPR) and clinical information systems. Enrollment is limited to 48 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Joseph M. Rosen

    Kendall L. Hoyt


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Joseph M. Rosen

    Kendall L. Hoyt


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Joseph M. Rosen

    Kendall L. Hoyt


  • ENGS 15
    Undergraduate Investigations in Engineering

    Description

    An original investigation in a phase of science or engineering under the supervision of a member of the staff. Students electing the course will be expected to have a proposal approved by the department chair and to meet weekly with the staff member supervising the investigation. The course is open to undergraduates who are not majoring in engineering. It may be elected only once, or taken as a one-third course credit for each of three consecutive terms. A report describing the details of the investigation must be filed with the department chair and approved at the completion of the course.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Required on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


  • ENGS 15.01
    Senior Design Challenge I

    Description

    The Senior Design Challenge is a two-term course designed to serve as a senior capstone experience for Dartmouth students across all majors. Students in this project-based course will practice human-centered design, developing not only the skills, but also the creative confidence to apply their liberal arts education to make a positive difference in the world beyond Dartmouth. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams on projects that will be determined in partnership with organizations in the Upper Valley. The project topics will be designed to give students some flexibility in determining the specific problem on which to focus, while ensuring client responsiveness and substantial fieldwork opportunities.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


  • ENGS 15.02
    Senior Design Challenge II

    Description

    The Senior Design Challenge is a two-term course designed to serve as a senior capstone experience for Dartmouth students across all majors. Students in this project-based course will practice human-centered design, developing not only the skills, but also the creative confidence to apply their liberal arts education to make a positive difference in the world beyond Dartmouth. Students will work in interdisciplinary teams on projects that will be determined in partnership with organizations in the Upper Valley. The project topics will be designed to give students some flexibility in determining the specific problem on which to focus, while ensuring client responsiveness and substantial fieldwork opportunities.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: L
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: L
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: L
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Korsunskiy


  • ENGS 16
    Biomedical Engineering for Global Health

    Description

    The past 20 years have seen an incredible amount of high-tech medical advances, but to what degree have these impacted the health of those living in the developing world? The potential for years of life gained through biomedical technology is tremendous in some of the world’s poorest regions, but appropriate design requires an understanding of the clinical, political, and cultural landscape, and a clean-slate approach to developing low-cost, effective tech. This course offers an exciting opportunity to understand how to design solutions for the most important health challenges of the developing world. Learning goals will be achieved through hands-on experience, including: a laboratory component where we deconstruct, design and build a low-cost medical device, case study discussions on successful global health innovations, and several “teardowns” of common medical devices. Lecturers from Thayer, Tuck School of Business, the Dartmouth Center for Health Care Delivery Science, and Geisel School of Medicine will cover complimentary topics in clinical medicine, healthcare delivery, innovation and medical imaging. A final project will bring everything together by addressing a real health problem with a prototype of a low-cost tech solution. Enrollment is limited to 40 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 17
    Making Music: The Art, Science, and Symbolism of Musical Instruments

    Description

    A hands-on course in which students working in groups build and assemble simple musical instruments with the aim of understanding how materials, technologies, craftsmanship, and cultural knowledge interact in the conception, design, and production of diverse instruments around the world. Merging the methodologies of materials science and engineering with the approaches of arts and humanities, the course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the social meanings and powers ascribed to musical instruments, and the way that instruments have come to function as potent symbols of personal, cultural, and political identity.

    Cross Listed Courses

    MUS 17.04/COCO 20
  • ENGS 18
    System Dynamics in Policy Design and Analysis

    Description

    This course introduces systems dynamics, an approach to policy design and analysis based upon feedback principles and computer simulation. The approach is useful for gaining an understanding of the underlying structural causes of problem behavior in social, economic, political, environmental, technological, and biological systems. Goals of this approach are to gain better understanding of such problem behaviors and to design policies aimed at improving them. Lectures and exercises illustrate applications of the approach to real, current problems such as urban decay, resource depletion, environmental pollution, product marketing and distribution, and agricultural planning in an expanding population. The similarity and transferability of underlying feedback characteristics among various applications is emphasized. No prior engineering or computer science experience is necessary.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


  • ENGS 100
    Methods in Applied Mathematics I

    Description

    Concepts and methods used in the treatment of linear equations with emphasis on matrix operations, differential equations, and eigenvalue problems will be developed following a brief review of analytic function theory. Topics include the Fourier integral, finite and infinite dimensional vector spaces, boundary value problems, eigenfunction expansions, Green's functions, transform techniques for partial differential equations, and series solution of ordinary differential equations. Properties and uses of orthogonal polynomials and special functions such as the hypergeometric, Bessel, Legendre, and gamma functions are included. Applications in engineering and physics are emphasized.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 92 or MATH 33 or MATH 43, with permission of instructor, or the equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


  • ENGS 103
    Operations Research

    Description

    This course provides an overview of a broad range of deterministic and probabilistic operations research models with a focus on engineering applications. Emphasis is on developing strong formulations, understanding key solution concepts, developing efficient algorithms, and grasping the advantages and limitations of each approach. After a brief overview of linear and discrete optimization models, the course covers four main types of techniques: network models, queuing theory, discrete events simulation and game theoretic analysis. Various network models and the corresponding solution algorithms are discussed. Key results and applications of queuing models are presented. Uncertainty associated with real-world modeling is captured through simulation techniques with specific emphasis on discrete events simulation. Equilibrium modeling concepts for strategic form games and extensive form games are introduced as extensions of the core optimization concepts. Application examples are drawn from aerospace, biomedical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, mechanical, and systems engineering.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 93 or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vikrant S. Vaze


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vikrant S. Vaze


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vikrant S. Vaze


  • ENGS 104
    Optimization Methods for Engineering Applications

    Description

    An introduction to various methods of optimization and their uses in modern engineering. Students will learn to formulate and analyze optimization problems and apply optimization techniques in addition to learning the basic mathematical principles on which these techniques are based. Topic coverage includes linear programming, nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, combinatorial optimization and Monte Carlo methods.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 22 and ENGS 27 or equivalents, or permission of instructor

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 105
    Computational Methods for Partial Differential Equations I

    Description

    This course concentrates on the numerical solution of partial differential equations commonly encountered in Engineering Sciences. Finite difference and finite element methods are used to solve problems in heat flow, wave propagation, vibrations, fluid mechanics, hydrology, and solid mechanics. The course materials emphasize the systematic generation of numerical methods for elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic problems, and the analysis of their stability, accuracy, and convergence properties. Weekly computer exercises will be required to illustrate the concepts discussed in class.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 23 and ENGS 91 (COSC 71), or equivalents

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Keith D. Paulsen


  • ENGS 106
    Numerical Linear Algebra

    Description

    The course examines, in the context of modern computational practice, algorithms for solving linear systems Ax = b and Ax = λx. Matrix decomposition algorithms, matrix inversion, and eigenvector expansions are studied. Algorithms for special matrix classes are featured, including symmetric positive definite matrices, banded matrices, and sparse matrices. Error analysis and complexity analysis of the algorithms are covered. The algorithms are implemented for selected examples chosen from elimination methods (linear systems), least squares (filters), linear programming, incidence matrices (networks and graphs),

    Prerequisites

    COSC 71 or ENGS 91. Students are to be familiar with approximation theory, error analysis, direct and iterative technique for solving linear systems, and discretization of continuous problems to the level normally encountered in an undergraduate course in numerical analysis.

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 271

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGG 107
    Bayesian Statistical Modeling and Computation

    Description

    This course will introduce the Bayesian approach to statistical modeling as well as the computational methods necessary to implement models for research and application. Methods of statistical learning and inference will be covered for a variety of settings. Students will have the opportunity to apply these methods in the context of their own research or area of application in the form of a term project.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 93 or comparable course in probability and statistics; previous programming experience with Matlab, C, S, R or similar language. (MATH/COSC 71, ENGS 91, COSC 70/170 are appropriate ways to fulfill the programming requirement.)

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 108
    Applied Machine Learning

    Description

    This course will introduce students to modern machine learning techniques as they apply to engineering and applied scientific and technical problems. Techniques such as recurrent neural networks, deep learning, reinforcement learning and online learning will be specifically covered. Theoretical underpinnings such as VC-Dimension, PAC Learning and universal approximation will be covered together with applications to audio classification, image and video analysis, control, signal processing, computer security and complex systems modeling. Students will gain experience with state-of-the-art software systems for machine learning through both assignments and projects

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20 or equivalent, MATH 22 or equivalent, ENGS 27 or ENGS 93 or equivalent.

    Cross Listed Courses

    QBS 108

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


  • ENGS 110
    Signal Processing

    Description

    Continuous and discrete time signals and systems. The discrete Fourier Transform and the fast Fourier Transform. Linear filtering of signals and noise. Characterization of random signals using correlation functions and power spectral densities. Problems will be assigned which require the use of the computer.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 32 and ENGS 92 or equivalents

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


  • ENGS 111
    Digital Image Processing

    Description

    Digital image processing has come into widespread use in many fields, including medicine, industrial process monitoring, military and security applications, as well as satellite observation of the earth. This course will cover many aspects of image processing that students will find valuable in their research or personal interest. Topics will include: image sources, computer representation of images and formats, operations on images, and image analysis. In this course we will stretch the conventional notion of images from 2D pixel arrays to include 3D data sets, and we will explore how one can process such stacks of voxels to produce useful information. This course will also touch on some advanced topics in image processing, which may vary based on students interests. This course will require the completion of a project selected by the student.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 92 and ENGS 93 or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Alexander Hartov


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Alexander Hartov


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Alexander Hartov


  • ENGS 112
    Modern Information Technologies

    Description

    This course covers current and emerging information technologies, focusing on their engineering design, performance, and application. General topics, such as distributed component and object architectures, wireless networking, web computing, and information security, will be covered. Specific subjects will include Java, CORBA, JINI public key cryptography, web search engine theory and technology, and communications techniques relevant to wireless networking such as Code Division Multiple Access protocols and cellular technology.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20, ENGS 93 and ENGS 27 or COSC 60. ENGS 93 can be taken concurrently.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


  • ENGG 113
    Image Visualization and Analysis

    Description

    The goal of this course is to introduce graduate level and senior undergraduate students who are working in imaging research to image processing and visualization in 3D using advanced libraries and fully functional software development framework. The most widely used open source software tools for medical image analysis and visualization will be used as the platform: The Insight Registration Segmentation Toolkit (ITK), the Visualization Toolkit (VTK), OpenCV, Qt, and CMake. ITK is an open-source, widely adopted, cross-platform system that provides developers with an extensive suite of software tools for image analysis, including fundamental algorithms for image segmentation and registration. VTK is an open-source, widely adopted, software system for 3D computer graphics, modeling, image processing, volume rendering, scientific visualization, and information visualization. The student will gain understanding of the working of all subroutines and practical application implementing these routines into customized workflow. The course will also introduce the use of OpenCV for applying computer vision and machine learning algorithms to biomedical images and data. Moreover, a full software development environment will be employed to create release-quality applications. This will include the use of source version control to track code changes and bugs, Qt for user interface development, CMake for development environment control, and Visual Studio C++ for the coding environment (Python is also permitted for students with substantial experience working with the language). This state of the art forms the basis for most medical visualization software used today, and students will learn the use of these tools and complete required exercises and projects, with an emphasis on real-world clinical applications.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 65 or Permission of the Instructor

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Michael Jermyn


  • ENGS 114
    Networked Multi-Agent Systems

    Description

    Design and analysis of networked systems comprised of interacting dynamic agents will be considered. Inspired by the cohesive behavior of flocks of birds, we design self-organizing engineering systems that mimic a sense of coordinated motion and the capability of collaborative information processing similar to flocks of birds. Examples include multi-robot networks, social networks, sensor networks, and swarms. The course combines concepts in control theory, graph theory, and complex systems in a unified framework.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 26, MATH 23, or equivalents plus familiarity with MATLAB

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 115
    Parallel Computing

    Description

    Parallel computation, especially as applied to large scale problems. The three main topics are: parallel architectures, parallel programming techniques, and case studies from specific scientific fields. A major component of the course is laboratory experience using at least two different types of parallel machines. Case studies will come from applications areas such as seismic processing, fluid mechanics, and molecular dynamics.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 91 (or COSC 71 or equivalent)

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 116
    Computer Engineering: Computer Architecture

    Description

    The course provides an introduction to the field of computer architecture. The history of the area will be examined, from the first stored program computer to current research issues. Topics covered will include successful and unsuccessful machine designs, cache memory, virtual memory, pipelining, instruction set design, RISC/CISC issues, and hardware/software tradeoffs. Readings will be from the text and an extensive list of papers. Assignments will include homeworks and a substantial project, intended to acquaint students with open questions in computer architecture.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 31 and COSC 51; COSC 57, COSC 58, or equivalent recommended

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 251

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 120
    Electromagnetic Waves: Analytical and Modeling Approaches

    Description

    Conceptual development, analysis, and modeling in electromagnetic wave propagation, including boundary conditions, material properties, polarization, radiation, scattering, and phased arrays; emerging research and applications in the areas of electromagnetics and materials.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 64 or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


  • ENGG 122
    Advanced Topics in Semiconductor Devices

    Description

    The MOS device structure is the backbone of nearly all modern microelectronics. In this course the gate-insulator-semiconductor structure, commonly referred to as the metal-oxide- semiconductor or MOS structure, will be studied. The historical background of MOS devices and their fabrication will be briefly reviewed, as well as the basic MOS structure for accumulation, depletion and inversion. Advanced issues such as work function, trapped charge, interface traps, non-equilibrium operation and re-equilibration processes will be covered. Analysis of MOS in 1D including capacitance will be performed. The MOSFET will be analyzed with attention on short-channel effects, scaling, drain-induced barrier lowering, etc. The relationship between physics-based MOS device analysis and TCAD modelling will be explored. Other devices utilizing the MOS concept will be discussed, including power devices, CCDs and imaging devices, and FINFETs. The effects of radiation and other reliability issues will also be addressed.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 60 or equivalents

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


  • ENGS 123
    Optics

    Description

    The physical principles and engineering applications of optics, with an emphasis on optical systems. Geometric optics: ray tracing, first-order analysis, imaging, radiometry. Wave optics: polarization, interference, diffraction, Fourier optics. Sources and detectors. Fiber optic systems.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 or PHYS 41, and ENGS 92 or equivalent

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 123

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


  • ENGS 124
    Optical Devices and Systems

    Description

    Light has now taken its place beside electricity as a medium for information technology and for engineering and scientific instrumentation. Applications for light include telecommunications and computers, as well as instrumentation for materials science, and biomedical, mechanical, and chemical engineering. The principles and characteristics of lasers, detectors, lenses, fibers, and modulators will be presented, and their application to specific optical systems introduced. The course will be taught in an interdisciplinary way, with applications chosen from each field of engineering. Students will choose design projects in their field of interest.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 124

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 125
    Power Electronics and Electromechanical Energy Conversion

    Description

    Controlled use of energy is essential in modern society. As advances in power electronics extend the capability for precise and efficient control of electrical energy to more applications, economic and environmental considerations provide compelling reasons to do so. In this class, the principles of power processing using semiconductor switching are introduced through study of pulse-width-modulated dc-dc converters. High-frequency techniques, such as soft-switching, are analyzed. Magnetic circuit modeling serves as the basis for transformer, inductor, and electric machine design. Electromechanical energy conversion is studied in relation to electrostatic and electromagnetic motor and actuator design. Applications to energy efficiency, renewable energy sources, robotics, and micro-electromechanical systems are discussed. Laboratory exercises lead to a project involving switching converters and/or electric machines.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 and ENGS 32

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


  • ENGS 126
    Analog Integrated Circuit Design

    Description

    Design methodologies of very large scale integration (VLSI) analog circuits as practiced in industry will be discussed. Topics considered will include practical design considerations such as size and cost; technology processes; modeling of CMOS, bipolar, and diode devices; advanced circuit simulation techniques; basic building blocks; amplifiers; and analog systems. A design project is also required in which the student will design, analyze, and optimize a small analog or mixed analog/digital integrated circuit. This design and some homework assignments will require the student to perform analog and digital circuit simulations to verify circuit operation and performance. Lectures will be supplemented by guest lecturers from industry.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 32 and ENGS 61, or permission of instructor

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


  • ENGS 128
    Advanced Digital System Design

    Description

    Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) have become a major fabric for implementing digital systems, rivaling application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) and microprocessors/microcontrollers, particularly in applications requiring special architectures or high data throughput, such as digital signal processing. Hardware description languages (HDLs) have become the dominant method for digital system design. This course will advance the student's understanding of FPGA design flow and ability to perform HDL-based design and implementation on FPGAs. Topics include: FPGA architectures, digital arithmetic, pipelining and parallelism, efficient design using register transfer level coding and IP cores, computer-aided tools for simulation, synthesis, and debugging. The course is graded on a series of laboratory exercises and a final project.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 31 and ENGS 62 or COSC 51

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


  • ENGS 129
    Biomedical Circuits and Systems

    Description

    This course covers the fundamental principles of designing electronic instrumentation and measurement systems, including (i) operation and use of a range of transducers (ii) design of sensor interface circuits (iii) operation and use of different analog-to- digital converters (iv) signal processing algorithms and (v) event-driven microcontroller programming. While these engineering principles will be illustrated in the context of biomedical applications, they are equally relevant to other instrumentation and measurement scenarios. In the first half of the course, there are weekly labs during which students build various biomedical devices, such as an ECG-based heart rate monitor, an electronic stethoscope and an automatic blood pressure monitor. Each of these labs underscores a specific principle of instrumentation and measurement system design. The second half of the course is focused on a group project to build a single, moderately-complex piece of instrumentation, such as a blood oxygenation monitor.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 31, ENGS 32 and either ENGS 61, ENGS 62.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


  • ENGS 130
    Mechanical Behavior of Materials

    Description

    A study of the mechanical properties of engineering materials and the influence of these properties on the design process. Topics include: tensorial description of stress and strain; elasticity; plastic yielding under multiaxial loading; flow rules for large plastic strains; microscopic basis for plasticity; viscoelastic deformation of polymers; creep; fatigue; and fracture.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 and ENGS 33, or equivalent

    Notes

    Classnotes will be distributed at the start of the class.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Erland M. Schulson


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Erland M. Schulson


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Erland M. Schulson


  • ENGS 131
    Science of Solid State Materials

    Description

    This course provides a background in solid state physics and gives students information about modern directions in research and application of solid state science. The course serves as a foundation for more advanced and specialized courses in the engineering of solid state devices and the properties of materials. The main subjects considered are: crystal structure, elastic waves-phonones, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics, lattice heat capacity and thermal conductivity, electrons in crystals, electron gas heat capacity and thermal conductivity, metals, semiconductors, superconductors, dielectric and magnetic properties, and optical properties. Amorphous solids, recombination, photoconductivity, photoluminescence, injection currents, semiconductor lasers, high temperature superconductors, and elements of semiconductor and superconductor microelectronics are considered as examples.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 or PHYS 24 or CHEM 76 or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu


  • ENGS 132
    Thermodynamics and Kinetics in Condensed Phases

    Description

    This course discusses the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase changes and transport in condensed matter, with the objective of understanding the microstructure of both natural and engineered materials. Topics include phase equilibria, atomic diffusion, interfacial effects, nucleation and growth, solidification of one-component and two-component systems, solubility, precipitation of gases and solids from supersaturated solutions, grain growth, and particle coarsening. Both diffusion-assisted and diffusionless or martensitic transformations are addressed. The emphasis is on fundamentals. Applications span the breadth of engineering, including topics such as polymer transformations, heat treatment of metals, processing of ceramics and semiconductors. Term paper.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 and ENGS 25, or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Erland M. Schulson


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Erland M. Schulson


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Erland M. Schulson


  • ENGS 133
    Methods of Materials Characterization

    Description

    This survey course discusses both the physical principles and practical applications of the more common modern methods of materials characterization. It covers techniques of both microstructural analysis (OM, SEM, TEM, electron diffraction, XRD), and microchemical characterization (EDS, XPS, AES, SIMS, NMR, RBS, and Raman spectroscopy), together with various scanning probe microscopy techniques (AFM, STM, EFM, and MFM). Emphasis is placed on the information that can be obtained together with the limitations of each technique. The course has a substantial laboratory component, including a project involving written and oral reports, and requires a term paper.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 or permission

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 128 and CHEM 137

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ian Baker


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ian Baker


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ian Baker


  • ENGS 134
    Nanotechnology

    Description

    Current papers in the field of nanotechnology will be discussed in the context of the course material. In the second half of the term, students will pick a topic of interest and have either individual or small group meetings to discuss literature and research opportunities in this area. The students will prepare a grant proposal in their area of interest.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 or PHYS 19 or CHEM 6, or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu


  • ENGS 135
    Thin Films and Microfabrication Technology

    Description

    This course covers the processing aspects of semiconductor and thin film devices. Growth methods, metallization, doping, insulator deposition, patterning, and analysis are covered. There are two major projects associated with the course — an experimental investigation performed in an area related to the student's research or interests, and a written and oral report on an area of thin film technology.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Christopher G. Levey


  • ENGG 138
    Corrosion and Degradation of Materials

    Description

    Application of the thermodynamics and kinetics of electrochemical reactions to the understanding of such corrosion phenomena as oxidation, passivity, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue. Discussion of methods of corrosion control and prevention including alloy selection, environmental control, anodic and cathodic protection, and protective coatings. Some treatment of the environmental degradation of non-metals and polymers. Applications to current materials degradation problems in marine environments, petrochemical and metallurgical industries, and energy conversion systems.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 and CHEM 5

    Notes

    Can be used by undergraduates for A.B. course count only

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li


  • ENGS 142
    Intermediate Solid Mechanics

    Description

    Exact and approximate solutions of the equations of elasticity are developed and applied to the study of stress and deformation in structural and mechanical elements. The topics will include energy methods, advanced problems in torsion and bending, stress concentrations, elastic waves and vibrations, and rotating bodies. Although most applications will involve elastic deformation, post-yield behavior of elastic-perfectly plastic bodies will also be studied. The course will also include numerous applications of finite element methods in solid mechanics.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 71 or ENGS 76 or equivalent
  • ENGS 145
    Modern Control Theory

    Description

    A continuation of ENGS 26, with emphasis on digital control, state-space analysis and design, and optimal control of dynamic systems. Topics include review of classical control theory, discrete-time system theory, discrete modeling of continuous-time systems, transform methods for digital control design, the state-space approach to control system design, optimal control, and effects of quantization and sampling rate on performance of digital control systems. Laboratory exercises reinforce the major concepts; the ability to program a computer in a high-level language is assumed.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 26

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


  • ENGS 146
    Computer-Aided Mechanical Engineering Design

    Description

    An investigation of techniques useful in the mechanical design process. Topics include computer graphics, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, computer-aided (finite element) analysis, and the influence of manufacturing methods on the design process. Project work will be emphasized. Enrollment is limited to 24 students.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 76

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Solomon G. Diamond


  • ENGS 147
    Mechatronics

    Description

    Mechatronics is the systems engineering approach to computer-controlled products. This course will integrate digital control theory, real-time computing, software design, sensing, estimation, and actuation through a series of laboratory assignments, complementary lectures, problem sets, and a final project. Topics covered will include microprocessor based real-time computing, digital control, state estimation, signal conditioning, sensors, autonomous navigation, and control architectures for autonomous systems.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 26 or ENGS 145; two of ENGS 31, ENGS 32, ENGS 33, ENGS 76, or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Laura E. Ray


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Laura E. Ray


  • ENGG 148
    Structural Mechanics

    Description

    Development and application of approximate and "exact" analytical and computational methods of analysis to a variety of structural systems, including trusses, two- and three-dimensional frames, plates and/or shells. Modeling of structural systems as one and multi degree of freedom lumped systems permits analysis under a variety of dynamic loads as well as providing an introduction to vibration analysis.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 33

    Notes

    Can be used by undergraduates for A.B. course count only

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


  • ENGG 149
    Introduction to Systems Identification

    Description

    This course provides the fundamentals of system identification theory and its applications to mechanical, electrical, civil, and aerospace systems. Several state-of-the-art identification algorithms in current engineering practice will be studied. The following topics are covered: discrete-time and continuous-time models, state-space and input-output models, Markov parameters, observer Markov parameters, discrete Fourier transform, frequency response functions, singular value decomposition, least-squares parameter estimation, minimal realization theory, observer/Kalman filter identification, closed-loop system identification, nonlinear system identification, recursive system identification, and introduction to adaptive control.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22 and ENGS 26, or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


  • ENGS 150
    Intermediate Fluid Mechanics

    Description

    Following a review of the basic equations of fluid mechanics, the subjects of potential flow, viscous flows, boundary layer theory, turbulence, compressible flow, and wave propagation are considered at the intermediate level. The course provides a basis for subsequent more specialized studies at an advanced level.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 25, ENGS 34, or permission of the instructor

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


  • ENGS 151
    Environmental Fluid Mechanics

    Description

    Applications of fluid mechanics to natural flows of water and air in environmentally relevant systems. The course begins with a review of fundamental fluid physics with emphasis on mass, momentum, and energy conservation. These concepts are then utilized to study processes that naturally occur in air and water, such as boundary layers, waves, instabilities, turbulence, mixing, convection, plumes, and stratification. The knowledge of these processes is then sequentially applied to the following environmental fluid systems: rivers and streams, wetlands, lakes and reservoirs, estuaries, the coastal ocean, smokestack plumes, urban airsheds, the lower atmospheric boundary layer, and the troposphere. Interactions between air and water systems are also studied in context, e.g., sea breeze in the context of the lower atmospheric boundary layer.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 25, ENGS 34, and ENGS 37, or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


  • ENGS 152
    Magnetohydrodynamics

    Description

    The fluid description of plasmas and electrically conducting fluids including magnetohydrodynamics and two-fluid fluid theory, with applications to laboratory and space plasmas, including magnetostatics, stationary flows, waves, instabilities, and shocks.

    Prerequisites

    PHYS 68 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 115

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 153
    Computational Plasma Dynamics

    Description

    Theory and computational techniques used in contemporary plasma physics, especially nonlinear plasma dynamics, including fluid, particle and hybrid simulation approaches as well as linear dispersion codes and data analysis. This is a "hands-on" numerical course; students run plasma simulation codes and do a significant amount of new programming (using MATLAB).

    Prerequisites

    PHYS 68 or equivalent with ENGS 91 or equivalent recommended, or permission of the instructor

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 118

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 155
    Intermediate Thermodynamics

    Description

    The concepts of work, heat and thermodynamic properties are reviewed. Special consideration is given to derivation of entropy through information theory and statistical mechanics. Chemical and phase equilibria are studied and applied to industrial processes. Many thermodynamic processes are analyzed; the concept of exergy is used to evaluate their performance and identify ways to improve their efficiency.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 25

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost


  • ENGS 156
    Heat, Mass, and Momentum Transfer

    Description

    Fundamentals of convection, conduction, radiation, mass, and momentum transport. Basic conservation laws and rate equations in laminar and turbulent flows. Exact solutions. Approximate solutions using boundary layer or integral techniques. Empirical methods. Analysis of engineering systems.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 25, ENGS 34

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky


  • ENGS 157
    Chemical Process Design

    Description

    An in-depth exposure to the design of processes featuring chemical and/or biochemical transformations. Topics will feature integration of unit operations, simulation of system performance, sensitivity analysis, and system-level optimization. Process economics and investment return will be emphasized, with extensive use of the computer for simulation and analysis.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 36

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


  • ENGS 158
    Chemical Kinetics and Reactors

    Description

    The use of reaction kinetics, catalyst formulation, and reactor configuration and control to achieve desired chemical transformations. The concepts and methods of analysis are of general applicability. Applications include combustion, fermentations, electrochemistry, and petrochemical reactions.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 36

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


  • ENGS 159
    Molecular Sensors & Nanodevices in Biomedical Engineering

    Description

    Introduction to fundamentals and major types of molecular sensor systems, scaling laws of device miniaturization, and detection mechanisms, including molecular capture mechanisms; electrical, optical, and mechanical transducers; micro-array analysis of biomolecules; semiconductor and metal nanosensors; microfluidic systems; and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS, BioMEMS) design, fabrication and applications for bioengineering. Three lab sessions are designed to gain hands-on experience on microfluidic chip and soft lithography, gold nanorods-based biomolecular sensors, micro-reactors using colloidal chemistry in engineering of nanoparticles for biomedical applications in sensing and imaging.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, CHEM 6, or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John Zhang


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John Zhang


  • ENGS 160
    Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering

    Description

    A graduate section of ENGS 35 involving a project and extra class meetings. Not open to students who have taken ENGS 35. Enrollment is limited to 6.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3, CHEM 5, BIOL 12 or BIOL 13 and permission of the instructor

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


  • ENGS 161
    Metabolic Engineering

    Description

    Metabolic engineering combines aspects of chemical engineering, systems biology and synthetic biology. This course focuses on developing a quantitative understanding of metabolic processes within the cell. Although metabolism is a complex process, it is determined by a small number of physical constraints, including enzyme activity, mass balance and thermodynamics. In this course you will learn to perform a mass balance, construct and analyze a stoichiometric network, simulate a series of kinetic reactions, and analyze isotope tracer experiments. Key genetic techniques, including CRISPR, will be presented. Computational analysis will be performed using COBRA and Equilibrator via Python and associated tools in the Python Data Science stack. These tools will be applied first to several canonical examples from the metabolic engineering literature and then to a project of your choosing.

    Prerequisites

    Engineering Sciences 35/160 and a non-introductory course in biochemistry or molecular biology, or permission.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Daniel G. Olson


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Daniel G. Olson


  • ENGS 162
    Basic Biological Circuit Engineering

    Description

    This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the design, modeling, and experimental implementation of synthetic bio-molecular circuits in living cells, which have wide applications in biotechnology and medicine. Simple but sophisticated synthetic biological circuits will be implemented and tested in microbial cells in the laboratory. Computer aided design, modeling, and simulation will use an industry standard electronic circuit design tool showing how to design, model, and fit actual experimental biological data such that engineering circuit theory and biological experiment agree.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 or MATH 8 or equivalent experience in Basic Calculus, CHEM 5, BIOL 13. Experience in Molecular Biology is useful (e.g. ENGS 35, BIOL 45, & BIOL 46 or equivalent) but not necessary. Experience in Signals and System Modeling is also useful (e.g. ENGS 22) but not necessary.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


  • ENGS 163
    Advanced Protein Engineering

    Description

    This course will build on molecular engineering fundaments introduced in ENGS 58 and equip students to formulate novel engineered molecules by translating methods into practical design proposals. The three components of any protein engineering effort will be surveyed: host strain, library design, and selective pressure. Both gold standard and novel engineering methodologies will be studied, and tradeoffs among different techniques will be examined through detailed case studies. Data presentation and interpretation skills will be developed by examining current literature focused on proteins with practical utility.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 58, OR ENGS 160, OR BIOCHEM 101. Equivalent courses accepted with instructor’s permission.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


  • ENGS 165
    Biomaterials

    Description

    Consideration of material problems is perhaps one of the most important aspects of prosthetic implant design. The effects of the implant material on the biological system as well as the effect of the biological environment on the implant must be considered. In this regard, biomaterial problems and the bioelectrical control systems regulating tissue responses to cardiovascular and orthopedic implants will be discussed. Examples of prosthetic devices currently being used and new developments of materials appropriate for future use in implantation will be taken from the literature.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24, or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: T/Th 8:00-10:00
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan M. Chapman


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Tu/Th 8:30AM-10:00AM
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Tu/Th 8:30AM-10:00AM
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Douglas W. Van Citters


  • ENGG 166
    Quantitative Human Physiology

    Description

    This is a comprehensive review of the integrated functions of cells, organs, and systems of the human body, focusing both on physiology and quantitation. The hierarchy of systems is reviewed with basic explanation as well as function-based analysis. The educational goal is to acquire a working knowledge of most major body systems, and an expert level ability for quantitative modeling and measurement of their function. The foundations of physiology are reviewed in terms of flow and action from pressure-driven, electrical potential forces, chemical free energy, intermolecular forces, concentration and diffusion. Detailed sections on cellular membranes, energy cycles, action potentials, nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, renal physiology, gastrointestinal and endocrine physiology are reviewed. The class culminates in a detailed look at anatomy and imaging features as related to the functional physiology. Students are active instructors in the class, with weekly presentations expected.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22 or equivalent; BIOL 12 or BIOL 14 or ENGS 30; ENGS 23 or MATH 23 or PEMM 101

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Brian W. Pogue


  • ENGS 167
    Medical Imaging

    Description

    A comprehensive introduction to all major aspects of standard medical imaging systems used today. Topics include radiation, dosimetry, x-ray imaging, computed tomography, nuclear medicine, MRI, ultrasound, and imaging applications in therapy. The fundamental mathematics underlying each imaging modality is reviewed and an engineering picture of the hardware needed to implement each system is examined. The course will incorporate a journal club review of research papers, term tests, and a term project to be completed on an imaging system.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 92 (may be taken conconcurrently)

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote lectures, but optional on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Brian W. Pogue


  • ENGG 168
    Biomedical Radiation Transport

    Description

    This course will provide a general overview of radiation transport mechanisms in matter, beginning with a derivation of the Boltzmann radiation transport equation, and examining the various approximations possible. Focus on the single-energy Diffusion approximation will be examined in detail, as it relates to neutron diffusion nuclear reactors and optical photon diffusion. Review of photon diffusion in tissue will be discussed as it relates to tissue spectroscopy and imaging. Fundamental research papers in this field will be presented and reviewed, covering aspects of multiple scattering, Mie scattering, and scattering phase functions. Stochastic model-based approaches will be covered as well, such as the Monte Carlo model. Numerical approaches to solving these models will be introduced.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Brian W. Pogue


  • ENGS 169
    Intermediate Biomedical Engineering

    Description

    A graduate section of ENGS 57. Students taking the course for graduate credit will be expected to write a research proposal aimed at developing a specific surgical technology. Groups of 2-3 students will work together. The proposal will require an extensive literature review, a detailed proposal of research activities, alternative methods, and timeline, and a detailed budget and budget justification for meeting the research objectives. Weekly meetings will take place between the groups and Professor Halter to discuss progress. By the end of the term the groups are expected to have a complete proposal drafted. Enrollment is limited to 18 students. Not open to students who have taken ENGS 57.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 and ENGS 56 or equivalent

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


  • ENGS 170
    Neuroengineering

    Description

    This course will introduce students to currently available and emerging technologies for interfacing with the human brain. Students will study the fundamental principles, capabilities and limitations of a range of relevant technologies within the scope of noninvasive brain-computer interfaces, neural implants, neurostimulation, sensory substitution and neuroinformatics. The ethical and societal ramifications of these technologies will also be considered. Applications of neuroengineering technology in medicine will be emphasized such as the diagnosis and treatment of neurological diseases and neural rehabilitation.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22 and ENGS 56

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGS 171
    Industrial Ecology

    Description

    A product’s environmental impacts result from design, production, and operational choices. Industrial ecology identifies economic ways to improve these environmental impacts, chiefly by designing for circular material flows, improving energy effectiveness and material choice, changing user behavior, systems thinking, and otherwise promoting sustainability. The objective of this course is to do all of the above for a product to conceptually invent or innovate a market- viable alternative. To do this, a broad spectrum of industrial activities is reviewed, including products and services. This course examines to what extent environmental and social concerns have already affected specific industries, and where additional progress can be made. Student activities include a critical review of current literature, participation in class discussion, and a term project in design for the environment.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 21 and ENGS 37 or instructor permission for MBA students. Students should have a basic understanding of how to progress from initial concept to prototype, and should have a basic understanding of environmental impacts such as pollution and climate change.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote lectures, but optional on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: G
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


  • ENGS 172
    Climate Change and Engineering

    Description

    Earth’s climate is result of interplay between continental and moving atmospheric and oceanic systems with multiple forcing mechanisms and internal feedbacks. Fundamental heat, mass, and radiative transfer processes impacting the climate system will be examined to understand the drivers of current and past climate. Published regional and global impact projections and adaptation strategies for the future will be examined. Mitigation and sustainable energy will be investigated, and choices on the international, national and local scales will be discussed. Students will be required to actively participate in class by leading class discussions and actively engaging in small group activities. In addition, students will conduct a research project to design an adaptation and mitigation strategy for a community or business in a region of their choice, and will write a term paper and make an oral presentation of their findings.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 151 or ENGS 156 or EARS 178, or equivalent.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mary R. Albert


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mary R. Albert


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mary R. Albert


  • ENGG 173
    Energy Utilization

    Description

    Industrial societies are presently powered primarily by fossil fuels. Continuing to supply energy at the rate it is now used will be problematic, regardless of the mix of fossil fuels and alternatives that is used; yet western consumption patterns spreading through the rest of the world and other trends portend large increases in demand for energy services. Increased energy efficiency will be essential for meeting these challenges, both to reduce fossil-fuel consumption and to make significant reliance on alternatives feasible. Technical issues in efficient systems for energy utilization will be surveyed across major uses, with in-depth technical analysis of critical factors determining possible, practical, and economical efficiency improvements in both present technology and potential future developments. Areas addressed include lighting, motors and drive systems, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, transportation, appliances and electronics.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22 and at least two of the following: ENGS 25, ENGS 32, ENGS 34, ENGS 44, ENGS 52, ENGS 76, ENGS 104, ENGS 125, ENGS 150, ENGS 155, ENGS 156, and ENGM 184, or permission. ENGS 25 is strongly recommended.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


  • ENGS 174
    Energy Conversion

    Description

    This course will address the science and technology of converting key primary energy sources — fossil fuels, biomass, solar radiation, wind, and nuclear fission and fusion — into fuels, electricity, and usable heat. Each of these topics will be analyzed in a common framework including underlying fundamentals, constraints on cost and performance, opportunities and obstacles for improvement, and potential scale.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22 and at least two of the following: ENGS 25, ENGS 32, ENGS 34, ENGS 36, ENGS 44, ENGS 52, ENGS 76, ENGS 104, ENGS 125, ENGS 150, ENGS 155, ENGS 156, and ENGM 184, or permission. ENGS 25 is strongly recommended.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


  • ENGS 175
    Energy Systems

    Description

    A consideration of energy futures and energy service supply chains at a systemic level. Dynamic development of demand and supply of primary energy sources and key energy carriers will be considered first assuming continuation of current trends, and then with changes to current trends in order to satisfy constraints such as limiting carbon emissions and changing resource availability. Integrated analysis of spatially-distributed time-variable energy systems will also be addressed, with examples including generation, storage, and distribution of electricity and production of energy from biomass.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 25, ENGS 51, either ENGG 173 or ENGG 174 or permission of the instructor

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


  • ENGG 176
    Design for Manufacturing

    Description

    Design for Manufacturing (DFM) is an analysis-supported design approach in which analytical models incorporating manufacturing input are used at the earliest stages of design in order to influence part and product design towards those design choices that can be produced more easily and more economically. DFM analysis addresses any aspect of the developing design of parts in which the issues of manufacturing are involved. The designed object is considered explicitly through its geometries and material selection and their impact on manufacturing costs. This course is intended primarily for students interested in mechanical, industrial, and manufacturing engineering as well as for engineering design practitioners in industry. The course will emphasize those processes most often used in the mass production of consumer products and will include such processes as assembly, injection molding, die casting, stamping and forging.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 73 or permission of instructor

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGG 177
    Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty

    Description

    Making decisions under conditions of risk and uncertainty is a fundamental part of every engineer and manager's job, whether the situation involves product design, investment choice, regulatory compliance, or human health and safety. This course will provide students with both qualitative and quantitative tools for structuring problems, describing uncertainty, assessing risks, and reaching decisions, using a variety of case studies that are not always amenable to standard statistical analysis. Bayesian methods will be introduced, emphasizing the natural connections between probability, utility, and decision-making.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 27, ENGS 93, or comparable background in probabilistic reasoning

    Notes

    Not offered 2021-2023
  • ENGM 178
    Technology Assessment

    Description

    This project course is grounded in technology-focused areas and provides an opportunity for teams of students to conduct a thorough analysis of prevalent and emerging technologies in fields of critical interest such as health, energy, the environment, and other complex systems and then to recommend and justify actions for its further development. Technology in an assigned application field will be analyzed by each student team, along with emerging, complementary and competing technologies, leading to 1) findings of those impediments and incentives for its further development, 2) identification and quantification of the societal and/or commercial benefits achievable from further development, and 3) recommendations for action in research funding, product and market development, public policy, and the like, that would most rapidly achieve the identified societal and/or commercial benefits.

    Prerequisites

    No prerequisite

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ross A. Gortner


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ross A. Gortner


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ross A. Gortner


  • ENGM 179.1
    Organizational Behavior

    Description

    Organizations are complex social systems that bring together tasks, structures, people and culture. Their success depends on people interacting within this system to achieve common goals. This course will provide you with conceptual frameworks for increasing individual, team, and organizational performance. More specific learning goals include: a) to increase your knowledge about individual, interpersonal and group behavior in complex organizations; b) to increase your awareness of your own and others’ assumptions, motivations, attitudes, values, emotions and behavior in human interaction; c) to increase your skill in diagnosing the structural and behavioral antecedents of destructive behavior in organizations, and prescribing effective action to remedy those problems; and d) to manage this complex system in service of achieving strategic goals. We will address these goals by learning about the underlying psychological and sociological foundations of human behavior and will engage in case study discussions and interactive exercises to help you build effective leadership skills.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


  • ENGM 179.2
    Strategy

    Description

    Strategy entails shaping and managing factors that are critical to the long-term success of an organization. Decision makers must formulate and implement strategy for the organization as a whole, and guide the organization in navigating strategic challenges as markets and technologies change. This course covers key frameworks and principles for formulating and implementing strategy in single-business and multi-business firms, with respect to the external context in which a firm competes and its internal operations. Applying this material to case studies and other company examples will help you to develop your skills in strategic analysis.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


  • ENGM 180
    Accounting and Finance

    Description

    This course provides an integrated exploration of financial accounting and finance. Financial accounting refers to the system a firm uses to both record its transactions and report its results to investors and other users of financial statements. Finance refers to the financial aspects of managerial decisions and the capital markets in which firms raise funds for investment to provide practical tools for financial decision making and valuation.  

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Richard C. Sansing

    Felipe Severino


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Richard C. Sansing

    Felipe Severino


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Richard C. Sansing

    Felipe Severino


  • ENGM 181
    Marketing

    Description

    This course introduces the role of marketing within business firms. Case studies drawn from a wide variety of consumer and industrial products and services provide an opportunity for students to apply concepts and techniques developed in assigned readings. Specific topics include customer analysis, market research, market segmentation, distribution channel policy, product policy and strategy, pricing, advertising, and sales force management. The course stresses oral and written expression and makes use of several computer exercises, spreadsheet analysis, and management simulations.

    Prerequisites

    Permission of instructor

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


  • ENGM 182
    Data Analytics

    Description

    This course provides a hands-on introduction to the concepts, methods and processes of business analytics. Students learn how to obtain and draw business inferences from data by asking the right questions and using the appropriate tools. Topics include data preparation, statistical tools, data mining, visualization, and the overall process of using analytics to solve business problems. Students work with real-world business data and analytics software. Where possible, cases are used to motivate the topic being covered. Students acquire a working knowledge of the “R” language and environment for statistical computing and graphics. Prior experience with “R” is not necessary, but students should have a basic familiarity with statistics, probability, and be comfortable with basic data manipulation in Excel spreadsheets.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 93 or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey G. Parker


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey G. Parker


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey G. Parker


  • ENGM 183
    Operations Management

    Description

    This course provides an introduction to the concepts and analytic methods that are useful in understanding the management of a firm's operations. We will introduce job shops, assembly lines, and continuous processes. Other topics include operations strategy, aggregate planning, production scheduling, inventory control, and new manufacturing technologies and operating practices.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 93

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: Fridays 10:30-12:00 & 1:00-2:30
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Laurens G. Debo


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tuck Faculty


  • ENGM 184
    Introduction to Optimization Methods

    Description

    An introduction to various methods of optimization and their use in problem solving. Students will learn to formulate and analyze optimization problems and apply optimization techniques in addition to learning the basic mathematical principles on which these techniques are based. Topic coverage includes linear, nonlinear, and dynamic programming, and combinatorial optimization.

    Prerequisites

    No Prerequisite

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Required on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Eric S. Bish


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric S. Bish


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric S. Bish


  • ENGM 185
    Topics in Manufacturing Design and Processes

    Description

    The course will consist of four main topics: 1) technical estimating, 2) design of experiments, 3) design for manufacturability, 4) statistical process control. We will review technical estimating (TE), a vital skill in today's rapidly changing industry. Illustrative and interesting examples will be used to hone TE techniques. Design of experiments (DOE) will be covered in detail using Montgomery's Design and Analysis of Experiments. Analysis of variance, model adequacy checking, factorial designs, blocking and confounding, regression models, nesting, and fractional factorial and Taguchi designs will be taught. Design for manufacturability (DFM) will be covered so that by the end of the course the student will know how to establish a successful DFM program to optimize and continuously improve designs and manufacturing processes. Cost estimating related to manufacturing processes will also be presented, followed by an overview of failure analysis techniques. The course will also introduce the basics of statistical process control, including the Shewhart Rules.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 93

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements
  • ENGM 186
    Technology Project Management

    Description

    Project management focuses on planning and organizing as well as directing and controlling resources for a relatively short-term project effort which is established to meet specific goals and objectives. Project management is simultaneously behavioral, and quantitative, and systematic. The course covers topics in planning, scheduling and controlling projects such as in new product development, technology installation, and construction. This course is aimed at both business and engineering students and combines reading and case-oriented activities.

    Prerequisites

    ENGM 184 or equivalent

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric S. Bish


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric S. Bish


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric S. Bish


  • ENGM 187
    Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship

    Description

    Innovation is the process of translating a new invention or discovery into a commercial product. In this course, some of the guiding principles in technology innovation and entrepreneurship are discussed. The principles encompass intellectual property including patents, product definition including minimal viable product and whole product, customer definition and focus, product development, marketing and sales and communication, and manufacturing. Financial modelling and funding sources are addressed. Leadership practices including hiring, team building, employees, outsourcing and working with investors are also discussed. Students will prepare papers on various topics, make presentations, and create a real or hypothetical business plan as part of the coursework.

    Prerequisites

    No Prerequisite

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Eric R. Fossum


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric R. Fossum


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric R. Fossum


  • ENGM 188
    Law for Technology and Entrepreneurship

    Description

    The solutions to many of the challenges of entrepreneurship in general, and to those of starting up a technologically based business in particular, are provided by the law. A grounding in the law of intellectual property, contractual transactions, business structures, debt and equity finance, and securities regulation, both in the U.S. and in an international context, will help inventors and entrepreneurs to manage this part of the process intelligently and with a high likelihood of success.

    Prerequisites

    No Prerequisite

    Notes

    Cannot be used to satisfy any A.B. degree requirements.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: M/Tu 8:30AM-10:00AM
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Oliver Goodenough


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: M/Tu 8:30AM-10:00AM
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Oliver Goodenough


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: M/Tu 8:30AM-10:00AM
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Oliver Goodenough


  • ENGM 189.1
    Medical Device Commercialization (.5 credit)

    Description

    This course is designed to expose students to the specialized business frameworks and essential tools for successful translation of biomedical technologies from the lab (concept) to the market (clinic) that are needed by medical device innovators and managers. The curriculum is intended to provide an overview of the process used to assess the commercial viability and potential business opportunity for innovative medical devices. Course content is based on the Concept to Clinic: Commercializing Innovation (C3i) Program offered by the NIH. Teams of 2-3 students will work to develop a commercialization plan for an innovative medical device of their choosing or one provided by the course instructors. Weekly lectures on topics ranging from business validation to regulatory strategies to reimbursement approaches will be followed by team presentations that define how each team proposes to navigate these aspects of medical device commercialization.

    Prerequisites

    Graduate standing in engineering or business administration.

    Notes

    ENGM 189.1 runs for the first five weeks of the term offered, and is followed by partner course ENGM 189.1 for the second five weeks of the term offered. Two classes per week, 5 weeks total. This course carries .5 credit. Cannot be used to satisfy any AB degree requirements.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: M/Tu 1:15-2:45
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: M/Tu 1:15-2:45
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


  • ENGM 189.2
    Medical Device Development (.5 credit)

    Description

    This module of the course is an overview of existing medical devices and discusses methods for development, evaluation, and approval of new medical devices. The course will cover both diagnostic and interventional devices, and cover clinical and pre-clinical testing issues, as well as a discussion of FDA approval processes, funding startups, and cost effectiveness analysis. The course will involve several case studies as examples. For projects, students will work in teams to analyze needs in the medical setting and come up with a plan for a new device, and analyze how best to develop it with a new startup. Two classes per week, 5 weeks total.

    Prerequisites

    Graduate standing in engineering or business administration.

    Notes

    ENGM 189.2 runs for the second five weeks of the term offered, and is preceded by partner course ENGM 189.1 for the first five weeks of the term offered. Two classes per week, 5 weeks total. This course carries .5 credit. Cannot be used to satisfy any AB degree requirements

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: M/Tu 1:15-2:45
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Keith D. Paulsen


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: M/Tu 1:15-2:45
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Keith D. Paulsen


  • ENGG 19901
    Advanced Electromechanical Energy Materials

    Description

    Electrochemical energy materials and devices are playing a vital role in our technology driven society, and are in massive and rapidly growing demand for applications ranging from portable electronics to electric cars, and from grid-level energy storage to defense purposes. This course will give an introduction to the materials developments and characterizations in diverse electrochemical devices, with a focus on various electrode materials and technologies. Topics include, for example, basic principles of electrochemistry; introduction of a series of electrochemical energy storage devices; materials in emerging new battery technologies; photoelectrochemistry and photovoltaic devices. This course focuses on understanding materials science and challenges in modern electrochemical devices. For example, how to engineer the structures and properties of materials to maximize their electrochemical performances? How to characterize structures and compositions of electrochemical materials? The course also includes guest lectures to introduce a variety of energy materials for broad applications, such as solar and electrochemical sensing, toxicity and sustainability of energy materials

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 24 or equivalent. (It is assumed that students do not have background in electrochemistry)
  • ENGG 19902
    Model Based Systems Engineering

    Description

    This course is designed to introduce students to the world of model-based systems engineering. Systems Engineering is an interdisciplinary field of engineering and engineering management that enables the realization of successful complex systems over their life-cycles. Systems Engineering integrates multiple disciplines and specialty groups into a team effort forming a structured development process that proceeds from concept to production to operation to obsolescence. Systems Engineering considers the technical, social, and business needs of all stakeholders with the goal of realizing a successful system. At its core, systems engineering utilizes systems thinking principles to organize this body of knowledge. This course will prepare students to engineer, analyze, and simulate complex systems. Such systems are characterized by a high level of heterogeneity and a large number of components. They will appreciate the physical, informatic, social and economic aspects of such systems. They will use systems thinking concepts and abstractions to manage complexity. They will learn to use model-based systems engineering techniques to model a system’s form, function, and concept. They will analyze the structure of these systems using graph-theoretic approaches. Finally, they will learn to simulate social, technical, and economic systems with continuous-time and discrete-event dynamics. The systems engineering skills developed over the course are applicable to a broad range of disciplinary applications.
    Design Credit

    Prerequisites

    ENGG 199, like other introductory graduate-level systems engineering courses at other universities, is meant to be taken after the student has well established their undergraduate engineering program.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


  • ENGG 19903
    High-Frequency Power Magnetics Design

    Description

    One of the fundamental advantages of power electronics is the ability to use high frequencies which enable reductions in physical size, weight and cost of passive components such as magnetics with losses also reduced. However high-frequency effects in both magnetic cores and in windings rapidly increase power losses at higher frequencies limiting performance and inhibiting the use of increased frequency to yield further improvements. After a review of magnetics modeling and design fundamentals, the class will examine best-practice techniques for high-frequency magnetics modeling and design. Selected recent and current research in modeling, design, and fabrication will be examined in detail, including self-resonant passive components. Finally, applications to wireless power transfer will be studied.

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


  • ENGS 2
    Integrated Design: Engineering, Architecture, and Building Technology

    Description

    An introduction to the integrated design of structures and the evolving role of architects and engineers. The course will investigate the idea that design excellence is very often the result of deep collaboration between engineers, architects, and builders and that it is only in relatively recent history that a distinction between these areas of expertise has existed. The historical, social, and architectural impact of structures will be explored and several structures and their designers will be studied in depth. Enrollment is limited to 50 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    John D. Wilson


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John D. Wilson


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John D. Wilson


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John D. Wilson


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John D. Wilson


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John D. Wilson


  • ENGS 3
    Materials: The Substance of Civilization

    Description

    With the exception of ideas and emotions, materials are the substance of civilization. From the "Iceman's" copper ax to indium phosphide gallium arsenide semiconductor lasers, materials have always defined our world. We even name our epochs of time based on the dominant material of the age: Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age and now Silicon Age. In addition to discussing the nature and processing of metals, polymers, ceramics, glass and electronic materials, this course will analyze the dramatic developments in civilization directly resulting from advances in such materials. The text Stephen Sass' The Substance of Civilization will be used in the course. Enrollment is limited to 50 students per section.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: K
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky

    Eric S. Bish


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ronald C. Lasky

    Eric S. Bish


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric S. Bish

    Ronald C. Lasky


  • ENGS 4
    Technology of Cyberspace

    Description

    This course will cover some basic concepts underlying the "information superhighway." The technologies of high-speed networking have stimulated much activity within the federal government, the telecommunications and computer industries, and even social science and popular fiction writing. The technical focus will be on communications technologies, information theory, and the communications requirements of video (standard and ATV), speech (and other audio), and text data. Social, economic, and policy issues will be an integral part of the course. Enrollment is limited to 30 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


  • ENGS 5
    Healthcare and Biotechnology in the 21st Century

    Description

    The course will explore technologies that will impact healthcare in the 21st century, including biology, robotics, and information. Included will be biotechnologies to be used for the treatment of diseases and the regeneration of missing organs and limbs. The course will also cover robotics that will replace human parts. Included will be artificial organs and joints, robots as replacement for human parts, the human genome project, gene therapy, biomaterials, genetic engineering, cloning, transplantation (auto, allo, and xeno), limb regeneration, man-machine interfaces, and prosthetic limbs. This section will also cover ethical issues related to the above topics and issues regarding the FDA and the approval of new medical treatments. We will discuss going beyond normal with respect to the senses, muscles, and creating wings. Enrollment is limited to 75 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie

    Joseph M. Rosen


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie

    Joseph M. Rosen


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Peter J. Robbie

    Joseph M. Rosen


  • ENGS 6
    Technology and Biosecurity

    Description

    This course will introduce students to the technologies used to combat biological threats to security ranging from pandemic influenza to bioterrorism. In particular, this course will explore the dual role that technology plays in both enhancing and destabilizing security. Specific technologies covered include the use of nanotechnology, synthetic biology, and mass spectrometry. The course considers questions such as: Where can technological solutions have the greatest impact? When can defensive technologies have offensive applications? And, how can we balance the need to regulate potentially dangerous technologies against the need for academic freedom and high tech innovation? Enrollment is limited to 30 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kendall L. Hoyt


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kendall L. Hoyt


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kendall L. Hoyt


  • ENGS 7.02
    Climate Change

    Description

    Climate change has occurred naturally and frequently over the course of many time scales in the past. America today is engaged in a discussion of current climate change and its cause, ranging from calls for immediate action to denial. This course explores the published scientific literature on the nature and cause of climate change, potential impacts on us, and the implications for our nation's energy issues. Through readings, class discussion, and individual research, we will explore this complex problem; student writing will synthesize results from the literature to clarify the factual basis for their own understanding. Reading will include a number of published papers and selections from textbooks. Students will be required to actively participate in class by leading class discussions and actively engaging in small group activities. In addition students will write two short papers, develop an annotated bibliography, and write a research paper based on the research completed for the annotated bibliography. Enrollment is limited to 16 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 7.05
    Contemporary and Historical Perspectives on Medical Imaging

    Description

    Medical imaging has evolved significantly over the last 100 years and has transformed modern medical practice to the extent that very few clinical decisions are made without relying on information obtained with contemporary imaging modalities. The future of medical imaging may be even more promising as new technologies are being developed to observe the structural, functional, and molecular characteristics of tissues at finer and finer spatial scales. This first-year seminar will review the historical development of modern radiographic imaging and discuss the basic physical principles behind common approaches such as CT, ultrasound, and MRI. Contemporary issues surrounding the use of imaging to screen for disease, the costs to the healthcare system of routine application of advanced imaging technology, and the benefits of the information provided by medical imaging in terms of evidence-based outcomes assessment will be explored. Students will be required to read, present, and discuss materials in class and write position papers articulating and/or defending particular perspectives on the historical development of medical imaging and its contemporary and/or future uses and benefits. Enrollment is limited to 16 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Keith D. Paulsen


  • ENGS 7.06
    Sustainability Revolution

    Description

    Humanity has previously seen two major resource transitions that have had radical impacts on day-to-day life: the Neolithic revolution (from hunting and gathering to agrarian) and the industrial revolution (from agrarian to pre-sustainable industrial). This writing course will consider the hypothesis that the human enterprise now requires a third such resource revolution - the sustainability revolution (from pre-sustainable industrial to sustainable industrial) - and that future generations will judge those of us alive today by how well we responded to this imperative. Topics addressed include past resource revolutions, resource and environmental metrics, energy, food, water, and climate. Writing assignments will include a personal essay, a critique encompassing one or a few sources, and an integrated analysis.

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 8
    Materials in Sports Equipment

    Description

    Sports equipment uses almost every type of material imaginable, as athletes and designers leverage state-of-the-art materials to maximize human efficiency, performance, comfort and safety. As something most people have some familiarity with, active Dartmouth students in particular, it is an excellent subject for an exploration of material characteristics, selection, design, and failure. This course will introduce materials science concepts in a way that is accessible and useful for the non-major. It will exercise student's critical thinking, quantitative and communication skills. In-class demonstrations will allow students to explore material behavior and differences between materials 'hands-on' and possible field trips or lab visits will introduce them to some engineering test methods. Finally, this course will demystify terms used by manufacturers and salespeople, and help students, as athletes and consumers, make informed equipment choices. Enrollment is limited to 40 students.

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 9
    Everyday Technology

    Description

    This course is intended to take the mystery out of the technology that we have grown to depend on in our everyday lives. Both the principles behind and examples of devices utilizing electricity, solid and fluid properties, chemical effects, mechanical attributes, and other topics will be discussed. In the associated lab project, students will dissect and analyze (and possibly revive!) a broken gadget or appliance of their choosing. Enrollment is limited to 50 students.

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott C. Davis


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott C. Davis


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott C. Davis


  • ENGS 19.01
    Future of Energy Systems

    Description

    Energy production, distribution, and use is central to human activity. In many quarters, there is growing appreciation for the nexus among energy, climate change, the environment, and economic development. This course will focus on futures of energy as they impact, and are impacted by, these drivers. The course uses model-based approaches to develop global-scale energy scenarios and to explore the potential evolution of current and potential energy options in both localized and global settings.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Steven O. Peterson


  • ENGS 20
    Introduction to Scientific Computing

    Description

    May not be taken under the Non-Recording Option This course introduces concepts and techniques for creating computational solutions to problems in engineering and science. The essentials of computer programming are developed using the C and Matlab languages, with the goal of enabling the student to use the computer effectively in subsequent courses. Programming topics include problem decomposition, control structures, recursion, arrays and other data structures, file I/O, graphics, and code libraries. Applications will be drawn from numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, root finding, matrix operations, searching and sorting, simulation, and data analysis. Good programming style and computational efficiency are emphasized. Although no previous programming experience is assumed, a significant time commitment is required. Students planning to pursue the engineering sciences major are advised to take ENGS 20. Students considering the computer science major or majors modified with computer science should take COSC 1 and COSC 10. Enrollment is limited to 50 students.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 and prior or concurrent enrollment in MATH 8

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Simon Shepherd


  • ENGS 21
    Introduction to Engineering

    Description

    The student is introduced to engineering through participation, as a member of a team, in a complete design project. The synthesis of many fields involving the laws of nature, mathematics, economics, management, and communication is required in the project. Engineering principles of analysis, experimentation, and design are applied to a real problem, from initial concept to final recommendations. The project results are evaluated in terms of technical and economic feasibility and social significance. Lectures are directed toward the problem, with experiments designed by students as the need develops. Enrollment is limited to 64 students. Priority will be given to sophomores.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan M. Chapman


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan M. Chapman


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: K
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan M. Chapman


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Vicki V. May


  • ENGS 22
    Systems

    Description

    The student is introduced to the techniques of modeling and analyzing lumped systems of a variety of types, including electrical, mechanical, reacting, fluid, and thermal systems. System input will be related to output through ordinary differential equations, which will be solved by analytical and numerical techniques. Systems concepts such as time constant, natural frequency, and damping factor are introduced. The course includes computer and laboratory exercises to enhance the students’ understanding of the principles of lumped systems. Students will develop the ability to write MATLAB code. Enrollment is limited to 50 students.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    MATH 13, PHYS 14, and ENGS 20

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John Zhang


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John Zhang


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    William J. Scheideler


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    John Zhang


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Amro M. Farid


  • ENGS 23
    Distributed Systems and Fields

    Description

    A study of the fundamental properties of distributed systems and their description in terms of scalar and vector fields. After a summary of vector-field theory, the formulation of conservation laws, source laws, and constitutive equations is discussed. Energy and force relations are developed and the nature of potential fields, wave fields, and diffusion fields is examined. A survey of elementary transport processes is given. Particular attention is given to the relation between the description of systems in terms of discrete and distributed parameters. Applications are chosen primarily from fluid mechanics, electromagnetic theory, and heat transfer. Includes a set of laboratories.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ulf L. Österberg


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ulf L. Österberg


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ulf L. Österberg


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    B Stuart Trembly


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Charles R. Sullivan


  • ENGS 24
    Science of Materials

    Description

    An introduction to the structure/property relationships, which govern the mechanical, the thermal, and the electrical behavior of solids (ceramics, metals, and polymers). Topics include atomic, crystalline, and amorphous structures; X-ray diffraction; imperfections in crystals; phase diagrams; phase transformations; elastic and plastic deformation; free electron theory and band theory of solids; electrical conduction in metals and semi-conductors. The laboratory consists of an experimental project selected by the student and approved by the instructor.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    PHYS 14 and CHEM 5

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu

    Christopher G. Levey


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu

    Christopher G. Levey


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Weiyang Li

    Daniel C. Cullen


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jifeng Liu

    Christopher G. Levey


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Harold J. Frost

    Daniel C. Cullen


  • ENGS 25
    Introduction to Thermodynamics

    Description

    The fundamental concepts and methods of thermodynamics are developed around the first and second laws. The distinctions between heat, work, and energy are emphasized. Common processes for generating work, heat, or refrigeration or changing the physical or chemical state of materials are analyzed. The use of thermodynamic data and auxiliary functions such as entropy, enthalpy, and free energy are integrated into the analysis. The numerous problems show how theoretical energy requirements and the limitations on feasible processes can be estimated. Enrollment is limited to 60 students.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 13, PHYS 13, ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Lee R. Lynd


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Lee R. Lynd


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Mark S. Laser


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Lee R. Lynd


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


  • ENGS 26
    Control Theory

    Description

    The course treats the design of analog, lumped parameter systems for the regulation or control of a plant or process to meet specified criteria of stability, transient response, and frequency response. The basic theory of control system analysis and design is considered from a general point of view. Mathematical models for electrical, mechanical, chemical, and thermal systems are developed. Feedback-control system design procedures are established, using root-locus and frequency response methods.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Laura E. Ray


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Laura E. Ray


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Minh Q. Phan


  • ENGS 27
    Discrete and Probabilistic Systems

    Description

    This course is an introduction to probabilistic methods for modeling, analyzing, and designing systems. Mathematical topics include the fundamentals of probability, random variables and common probability distributions, basic queueing theory, and stochastic simulation. Applications, drawn from a variety of engineering settings, may include measurement and noise, information theory and coding, computer networks, diffusion, fatigue and failure, reliability, statistical mechanics, ecology, decision making, and robust design.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 8 and either ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10. PHYS 13 or CHEM 5 recommended.

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    George Cybenko


  • ENGS 28
    Embedded Systems

    Description

    A vast number of everyday products, from home appliances to automobiles, are controlled by small embedded computers, invisible to the user. This course introduces, at an elementary level, the three basic components of all such embedded systems: sensors to measure the physical environment, actuators to produce the system behavior, and a microcontroller that processes the sensor data and controls the actuators. Topics: microcontroller architecture and programming, writing embedded software, analog- to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, interfacing sensors and actuators, and data communication. There are daily in-class design exercises and weekly labs. Enrollment for this initial offering is limited to 20 students.
    Includes Lab

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: G
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen

    Petra Bonfert-Taylor


  • ENGS 30
    Biological Physics

    Description

    Introduction to the principles of physics and engineering applied to biological problems. Topics include the architecture of biological cells, molecular motion, entropic forces, enzymes and molecular machines, and nerve impulses. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

    Prerequisites

    CHEM 5, PHYS 13 and PHYS 14 (or equivalent). PHYS 14 (or equivalent) may be taken concurrently. Students with strong quantitative skills who have taken PHYS 3 and PHYS 4 can enroll with permission of the instructor.

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 30

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kimberley Samkoe


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 31
    Digital Electronics

    Description

    This course teaches classical switching theory, including Boolean algebra, logic minimization, algorithmic state machine abstractions, and synchronous system design. This theory is then applied to digital electronic design. Techniques of logic implementation, from small scale integration (SSI) through application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), are encountered. There are weekly laboratory exercises for the first part of the course, followed by a digital design project in which the student designs and builds a large system of his or her choice. In the process, computer-aided design (CAD) and construction techniques for digital systems are learned. Enrollment is limited to 60 students.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 20 or COSC 1 and COSC 10

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 56

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Geoffrey P. Luke


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eric W. Hansen


  • ENGS 32
    Electronics: Introduction to Linear and Digital Circuits

    Description

    Principles of operation of semiconductor diodes, bipolar and field-effect transistors, and their application in rectifier, amplifier, waveshaping, and logic circuits. Basic active-circuit theory. Introduction to integrated circuits: the operational amplifier and comparator, to include practical considerations for designing circuits with off-the shelf components. Emphasis on breadth of coverage of low-frequency linear and digital networks, as well as on high order passive and active filter design. Laboratory exercises permit "hands-on" experience in the analysis and design of simple electronic circuits. The course is designed for two populations: a) those desiring a single course in basic electronics, and b) those that need the fundamentals necessary for further study of active circuits and systems.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, or equivalent background in basic circuit theory

    Cross Listed Courses

    PHYS 048

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Kofi M. Odame


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jason T. Stauth


  • ENGS 33
    Solid Mechanics

    Description

    After a brief review of the concepts of rigid body statics, the field equations describing the static behavior of deformable elastic solids are developed. The stress and strain tensors are introduced and utilized in the development. Exact and approximate solutions of the field equations are used in the study of common loading cases, including tension/compression, bending, torsion, pressure, and combinations of these. In the laboratory phase of the course, various methods of experimental solid mechanics are introduced. Some of these methods are used in a project in which the deformation and stress in an actual load system are determined and compared with theoretical predictions. The course includes a series of computer exercises designed to enhance the student's understanding of the principles of solid mechanics.
    Includes Lab
    Design Credit

    Prerequisites

    MATH 13 and PHYS 13

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Yan Li


    Term: Summer 2021
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Yan Li


    Term: Summer 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Yan Li


    Term: Summer 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Thayer Faculty


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Scott Snyder


  • ENGS 34
    Fluid Mechanics

    Description

    We interact with fluids every day. From complex systems such as cars, airplanes, and chemical plants, to simple devices like a bike pump, our world is filled with engineering applications that make use of the principles of fluid mechanics. This course surveys the fundamental concepts, phenomena, and methods in fluid mechanics, as well as their application in engineered systems and in nature. Emphasis is placed on the development and use of conservation laws for mass, momentum, and energy, as well as on the empirical knowledge essential to the understanding of many fluid dynamic phenomena. Examples are drawn from mechanical, chemical, civil, environmental, biomedical, and aerospace engineering.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Colin R. Meyer


  • ENGS 35
    Biotechnology and Biochemical Engineering

    Description

    A consideration of the engineering and scientific basis for using cells or their components in engineered systems. Central topics addressed include kinetics and reactor design for enzyme and cellular systems; fundamentals, techniques, and applications of recombinant DNA technology; and bioseparations. Additional lectures will provide an introduction to metabolic modeling as well as special topics. The course is designed to be accessible to students with both engineering and life-science backgrounds. This course has a graduate section, ENGS 160. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3, CHEM 5, BIOL 12 or BIOL 13 or permission

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Required on-campus components

    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: BL
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Tillman U. Gerngross


  • ENGS 36
    Chemical Engineering

    Description

    This course will expose students to the fundamental principles of chemical engineering and the application of these principles to a broad range of systems. In the first part of the course, aspects of chemical thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and transport phenomena will be addressed. These principles will then be applied to a variety of systems including industrial, environmental, and biological examples

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, ENGS 25 and CHEM 5

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Jiwon Lee


  • ENGS 37
    Introduction to Environmental Engineering

    Description

    A survey of the sources, measurement techniques, and treatment technologies relating to environmental pollution resulting from the activities of humans. The course will be technology-focused, but will also touch on topics related to the implementation of technology in the real world such as public perception, policy and legislation, and choosing between technological alternatives. Technological and other issues will be addressed relating to water pollution, air pollution, solid wastes, and the fate and transport of pollutants in the environment. Consideration of each area will include general background and key concepts, detailed design examples of importance in the area, and case studies/current topics. The course will include guest lecturers.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 and CHEM 5, or equivalent, or permission

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


  • ENGS 41
    Sustainability and Natural Resource Management

    Description

    Natural resources sustain human productivity. Principles of scientific resource management are established, including mathematical model development based on material balances and decision making based on dynamical and stochastic systems. Three generic categories of resource are analyzed: exhaustible, living, and renewable. In the first category, we emphasize the life-cycle of exploitation including exhaustion, exploration and substitution. In the living category, we explore population dynamics under natural and harvested regimes, for fisheries, fowl and forests. The renewable case of water is treated in terms of quantity and quality. Finally, air quality management is considered through the lens of assimilative capacity. Throughout, the intersection of natural processes and economic incentives is explored with dynamical systems theory, computer simulations, and optimization techniques. Case studies illustrate contemporary management problems and practices.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 23 or ENGS 22, and ENGS 37

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: E
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: E
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Benoit Cushman-Roisin


  • ENGS 43
    Environmental Transport and Fate

    Description

    Introduction to the movement and transformation of contaminants released in soils, rivers, and the atmosphere. Fundamentals of advective-dispersive reactive transport, including approaches for assessing and parameterizing the complex heterogeneity and anisotropy of natural media. Analysis of mixing processes that lead to dispersion at larger spatial and temporal scales. Basic principles are illustrated by application to real world examples of groundwater, river, and atmospheric pollution.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 8 or equivalent and either ENGS 37 or EARS 16

    Cross Listed Courses

    EARS 66.01

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: Arrange
    Location:
    Instructors:

    A&S Staff


  • ENGS 44
    Sustainable Design

    Description

    This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the principles of design for sustainability, with emphasis on the built environment. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and a major design project, students learn to design buildings and other infrastructure with low to no impact on the environment. Emphasis is on creative thinking, strategies for managing the complexity of the product life cycle of the infrastructure, and the thorough integration of human and economic aspects in the design. Homework and project activities provide practice in relevant engineering analysis. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 21 and ENGS 22 or SART 65

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Karolina Kawiaka


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Karolina Kawiaka


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Karolina Kawiaka


  • ENGS 46
    Advanced Hydrology

    Description

    A survey of advanced methods used to analyze the occurrence and movement of water in the natural environment. The watershed processes controlling the generation of runoff and streamflow are highlighted and used to explore the transport and fate of sediment and contaminants in watersheds. Throughout the course the ideas and concepts are explored through the primary literature, with emphasis given to methods of observation, measurement, data analysis, and prediction.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 3 and EARS 16 or 33 or BIO 53 or ENGS 43 or permission of instructor

    Cross Listed Courses

    EARS 76

    Distribution Code

    TAS
  • ENGS 50
    Software Design and Implementation

    Description

    Techniques for building large, reliable, maintainable, and understandable software systems. Topics include UNIX tools and filters, programming in C, software testing, debugging, and teamwork in software development. Concepts are reinforced through a small number of medium-scale programs and one team programming project.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    COSC 10

    Cross Listed Courses

    COSC 050

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Fall 2021
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Fall 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


    Term: Fall 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Stephen Taylor


  • ENGS 52
    Introduction to Operations Research

    Description

    Basic concepts of optimization are introduced as aids in systematic decision making in engineering contexts. Deterministic optimization is developed in the form of linear and integer programming and their extensions. Probabilistic models are introduced in terms of Markov chains, queuing and inventory theory, and stochastic simulation. The course emphasizes the application of these methods to the design, planning, and operation of complex industrial and public systems.

    Prerequisites

    MATH 8 and MATH 22 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: J
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: J
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Eugene Santos


  • ENGS 56
    Introduction to Biomedical Engineering

    Description

    This course will survey applications of engineering principles to medical diagnosis/treatment of disease, monitoring/measurement of physiological function, and rehabilitation/replacement of body dysfunction. Case studies will be used to highlight how engineering has advanced medical practice and understanding. Examples will be drawn from bioinstrumentation, bioelectricity, biotransport, biomaterials, and biomechanics. While investigations will focus primarily on the engineering aspects of related topics, issues surrounding patient safety, public policy and regulation, animal experimentation, etc., will be discussed as appropriate.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22, PHYS 13 and PHYS 14 (PHYS 14 may be taken concurrently)

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Spring 2021
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    P. Jack Hoopes


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    P. Jack Hoopes

    John Zhang


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    P. Jack Hoopes

    John Zhang


  • ENGS 57
    Intermediate Biomedical Engineering

    Description

    The basic biomedical engineering concepts introduced in ENGS 56 will serve as the foundation for exploring technology in a clinical environment. The specific clinical setting to be explored will be the operating room (OR). This course will introduce a variety of surgical procedures and technologies from an engineering perspective. Areas of focus will include patient monitoring, biophysical tissue properties, general surgical instrumentation, tissue cutting and binding technologies, and optical visualization technologies. In addition, state-of-the-art procedures employing image-guided, minimally invasive, laparoscopic, and robot-assisted surgical technologies will be discussed. The first half of the term will include weekly seminars presented by surgeons describing a particular surgical procedure, the technologies currently used and a surgeon’s “wish-list”. During the second half of the term, students will undertake a design project aimed at developing a technology that addresses a specific need within the OR. Enrollment is limited to 18 students.

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 23 and ENGS 56 or equivalent

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: C
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Spring 2022
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


    Term: Spring 2023
    Time: C
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Ryan J. Halter


  • ENGS 58
    Introduction to Protein Engineering

    Description

    Engineered biomolecules are powering an array of innovations in biotechnology, and this course will familiarize students with key developments in the field. An overview of foundational principles will cover concepts such as the central dogma of biology, atomic scale forces in protein structures, and protein structure-function relationships. Strategies for modifying protein structures will be surveyed, with a particular emphasis on genetic techniques. The development of proteins with practical utility will be highlighted using case studies.
    Culminating Experience
    Design Credit

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 35 or CHEM 41

    Distribution Code

    TAS

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Karl E. Griswold


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: F
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Karl E. Griswold


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: F
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Karl E. Griswold


  • ENGS 59
    Basic Biological Circuit Engineering

    Description

    This course will provide a comprehensive introduction to the design, modeling, and experimental implementation of synthetic bio-molecular circuits in living cells at an undergraduate level. Simple but sophisticated synthetic biological circuits will be implemented and tested in microbial cells in the laboratory including those involving molecular amplification, regulatory feedback loops with biological nonlinearities, and robust analog circuits. Computer aided design, modeling, and simulation will use CADENCE, an industry standard electronic circuit design laboratory tool. It will show them how to design, model, and fit actual experimental biological data such that engineering circuit theory and biological experiment agree.
    Includes Lab

    Prerequisites

    ENGS 22 or Permission of Instructor. Experience in Molecular Biology is useful (e.g. ENGS 35, BIOL 45, & BIOL 46 or equivalent) but not necessary.

    Distribution Code

    TLA

    Offered

    Term
    Time
    Location / Method
    Instructor(s)
    Term: Winter 2021
    Time: D
    Location:

    Remote with synchronous components

    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


    Term: Winter 2022
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


    Term: Winter 2023
    Time: D
    Location:
    Instructors:

    Rahul Sarpeshkar


  • ENGS 60
    Introduction to Solid-State Electronic Devices

    Description

    In this course the physical and operational principles behind important electronic devices such as the solar cell and transistor are introduced. Semiconductor electron and hole concentrations and carrier transport are discussed. Carrier generation and recombination including optical absorption and light emission are covered. P-N junction operation and its application to diodes, solar cells, LEDs, and photodiodes is developed. The field-effect transistor (FET) and bipolar junction transistor (BJT) are then discussed and their terminal operation developed. Application of transistors to bi