Rahul Sarpeshkar

Thomas E. Kurtz Professor
Professor of Engineering
Professor of Microbiology & Immunology
Professor of Physics
Professor of Molecular & Systems Biology
Chair, Neukom Cluster of Computational Science

​Office: Vail 507A, Geisel School of Medicine

rahul.sarpeshkar@dartmouth.edu

Overview

Professor Sarpeshkar's interdisciplinary research uses analog circuits and analog computation as a universal language to design advanced quantum, bio-molecular, and nano-electronic circuits and systems, from atom to living cell. These systems are experimentally implemented in living synthetic microbial DNA-RNA-protein circuits in his wet lab, and in nano-electronic supercomputing chips that emulate or are inspired by biological and quantum computation in his dry lab. His fundamental work has been applied to implantable medical devices, synthetic biology, systems biology, neural prosthetics, bio-inspired, and ultra-energy-efficient systems. His research group members have originated from a wide variety of disciplines including physics, bioengineering, microbiology, computer science, and analog circuit engineering.

Professor Sarpeshkar is Dartmouth's inaugural Thomas E. Kurtz Professor and Chair of the Neukom Computational Science Cluster. He is a Professor of Engineering, Physics, Microbiology & Immunology, and Molecular & Systems Biology. He has published 135 research articles, holds 36 patents, and has authored a leading textbook on analog circuits and bioelectronic systems. Prior to his joining Dartmouth, he was a tenured and award-winning professor at MIT.


Analog Supercomputers: From Quantum Atom to Living Body | Rahul Sarpeshkar | TEDxDartmouth

Research & Job Opportunities

Education

Research Interests

Analog synthetic biology; biological and bio-inspired super-computing chip design; quantum circuit design, quantum computation, and hybrid quantum-classical computation; feedback control systems; medical devices; ultra-low-power, fault tolerant, and ultra-energy-efficient systems; engineering systems that operate at the fundamental limits of physics

Teaching

Books

Selected Publications

Awards

News

In Dartmouth Engineer Magazine