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Benoit Cushman Roisin headshot

Benoit Cushman-Roisin

Professor of Engineering

Education

  • BS, Engineering Physics, University of Liège (Belgium) 1978
  • PhD, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Florida State University 1980

Research Interests

Environmental transport processes; environmental fluid mechanics; industrial ecology; sustainable design; energy efficiency

Selected Publications

  • Cushman-Roisin, B., 2008: "Beyond eddy diffusivity: An alternative model for turbulent dispersion," Env. Fluid Mech., 8, 543-549.
  • Cushman-Roisin, B., and A. D. Jenkins, 2006: "On a non-local parameterization for shear turbulence and the uniqueness of its solutions," Boundary-Layer Meterorol., 118, 69-82.
  • Cushman-Roisin, B., M. Gacie, P.-M. Poulain, and A. Artegiani, 2001:
  • Cushman-Roisin, B., N.J. Rice, and M.A. Moldaver, 2000: "A simulation tool for Industrial Ecology," J. Industrial Ecology 3, 131-144.
  • Esenkov, O. E., and B. Cushman-Roisin, 1999: "Modeling of two-layer eddies and coastal flows with a particle method," J. Geophys. Res, 104, 10959-10980.

Professional Activities

  • Editor-in-Chief (and Founding Editor), Environmental Fluid Mechanics, 2000-present.
  • Adjunct Professor, School of Environmental Sciences, University of Nova Gorica, Slovenia
  • Co-organizer and co-convener of "Modelling of Oceanic Vortices" colloquium, Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam

Courses

  • ENGS 41: Sustainability and Natural Resource Management
  • ENGS 171: Industrial Ecology
  • ENGS 151: Environmental Fluid Mechanics
  • ENGS 37: Introduction to Environmental Engineering

Patents

  • Geometry of heat exchanger with high efficiency | 9,134,072
  • Turbo-compressor-condenser-expander | 8,578,733

Research Projects

  • Environmental fluid mechanics

    Environmental fluid mechanics

    Environmental fluid mechanics research studies natural fluid systems as agents for the transport and dispersion of environmental contamination. Understanding transport and dispersion processes in natural fluid flows, from the microscale to the planetary scale, serves as the basis for the development of models aimed at simulations, predictions, and ultimately sustainable environmental management. Research within this scope is diverse and can involve a variety of scientific and engineering disciplines such as civil, mechanical, and environmental engineering, meteorology, hydrology, hydraulics, limnology, and oceanography.