Undergraduate Studies

Roll up your sleeves on day one. At Dartmouth you'll build things right from the start and work on real-world challenges—medical technologies, biofuels, hybrid cars, solar-powered robots—from our signature Introduction to Engineering class to your final capstone project. That's because the best way to learn engineering is to do engineering.

A.B. is from the Latin "artium baccalaureus."
Dartmouth is ranked #1 in commitment to undergraduate teaching for five out of the past six years by U.S. News.

Our bachelor's degrees

Why choose Dartmouth

William Kamkwamba
“Thayer School of Engineering is one of the reasons I chose Dartmouth," says William Kamkwamba ’14, whose memoir, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, was a New York Times bestseller. The book documents his building a windmill from scrap materials in his rural village in Malawi, Africa. "In addition to having a cool project-based curriculum (meaning I can get my hands dirty the first week there), Thayer School even has a lending library for power tools! Seeing this, I couldn’t stop smiling.” Kamkwamba says he’s also interested in studying entrepreneurship and learning Spanish. (Photo courtesy William Kamkwamba '14)

An engineer and ...

... an athlete, a poet, a musician, an artist, a doctor, a politician, a business owner. You name it, we've seen it. Our students, faculty, and staff combine their passion for engineering with a huge range of other interests. And that's the way we like it.

"I am an engineering major but I am interested in French, music, and the outdoors as well. Where else besides Dartmouth can I get an engineering degree and have time to take a term abroad in France as well as pursuing all of my other interests? The sheer number of opportunities available to Dartmouth students still amazes me. Doing all of the things I love as well as some things I never knew I liked is what the Dartmouth experience means to me." —Andrew Smist '13

See our I'm an engineer and ... video playlist.

We'll help you get your hands dirty

Engineering for everyone

Engineering isn't just for engineers. Thayer School offers a number of courses for non-majors to better understand the interactions of science, technology and society. You'll discover engineering's power to improve the world. You'll gain problem-solving skills useful in all areas of education and life. You may even decide to become an engineer.

Oh, and yes, the Machine Shop is open to you too: