Dartmouth Engineer - The Magazine of Thayer School of EngineeringDartmouth Engineer - The Magazine of Thayer School of Engineering

Journey to Greenland

Dartmouth faculty and students travel to the world's largest island to conduct research and train the next generation of scientists.

Photographs by Cameron Planck Th’20 & Austin Lines Th’21

The LC-130 ski-equipped military cargo plane.

The LC-130 is a ski-equipped military cargo plane operated by the 109th Air Wing located in Scotia, NY. The 109th is the only air wing in the world that operates this plane, which is capable of landing on snow and ice-covered runways. —C.P.

The Lockheed LC-130 military cargo plane

The Lockheed LC-130, a military cargo plane operated by the 109th Airlift Wing of the U.S. Air National Guard, was our ride to and from Kangerlussuaq and to the East Greenland Research Ice-core Project (EastGRIP) drilling site. The LC-130 is equipped with retractable skis that can land on snow and ice-covered runways. Inside, it was actually more comfortable than it looks. —C.P.

JSEP students on Nansen sleds towed by snowmachines

JSEP students are transported from the LC-130 to the main dome of the camp on Nansen sleds towed by snowmachines. —A.L.

Birdhouse

Oftentimes, birds will follow the LC-130 into camp and then lose their way home. EastGRIP scientists and researchers have built a birdhouse stocked with nuts and seeds for the adventurous feathered friends who unwittingly make it to the middle of the ice sheet. —A.L.

Geodesic Dome

The geodesic dome at EastGRIP cradled by a sundog at 2 a.m. This far north, the sun never sets, even in the dead of night. Our home away from home, the dome was built at the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling camp then dragged on skis for 450 kilometers to the EastGRIP site. —A.L.

Joint Science Education Project (JSEP) student

A student with the Joint Science Education Project (JSEP) takes a closer look at a grain of snow. —C.P.

Ice core drilling and processing equipment

Underneath the surface of EastGRIP is a network of tunnels that house the ice core drilling and processing equipment. Here, a JSEP student works with a scientist to section an ice core freshly extracted from about 1500 meters below the surface of the Greenland ice sheet. —C.P.

Point 660

Our group as we head from the parking area to the ice at Point 660. —C.P.

Austin Lines demonstrates to JSEP students

Austin Lines demonstrates to JSEP students how to use a pyranometer for measuring surface albedo, or light that is reflected off of the surface of the ice and snow. —C.P.

Joshua Elliott Th’17

Joshua Elliott Th’17, whose research takes him to Greenland every year, looks north as he stands on the edge of the ice sheet. —A.L.

Mid-day yoga

In our downtime, instructors indulged in mid-day yoga. —C.P.

Lake and mountainside views in Kangerlussuaq

Lake and mountainside views in Kangerlussuaq, the tiny town on the edge of the icesheet where we first landed in Greenland before heading to the EastGRIP drilling site. —C.P.

Views of Kangerlussuaq

Incredible views of Kangerlussuaq from our plane. —C.P.

Categories: Features

Tags: climate change, environment, projects, research, students

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