COVID-19 Information

MEng Focus Areas

Biological/Chemical Engineering

Biological engineering exists at the interface of engineering, biological, and chemical sciences. This interdisciplinary field brings to bear fundamental design principles to both elucidate and modulate the function of biological systems, ranging in scale from molecular to cellular to whole organisms. The bioengineer’s toolbox may include skills such as modeling, big data analysis, genetics, process design, biochemistry, and molecular, micro and cellular biology. By modeling, designing, engineering, and optimizing biological systems, bioengineers and biotechnologists are seeking to tackle key unmet needs in medicine, agriculture, industry, the environment, consumer markets, and more.

Core Courses

Example Non-engineering Courses

Notes

  1. ENGS 108, COSC 174, and QBS 108 are equivalent, and only one may be taken for credit.
  2. COSC 175 and QBS 175 are equivalent courses, and only one may be taken for credit.

Biomedical Engineering

Biomedical engineering is the broad area of study in which engineers use an interdisciplinary approach to solve problems in the medical field, often associated with the interaction between living and non-living systems. The program is intended for engineers who want to add depth to their knowledge or acquire new specialized knowledge in biomedical engineering. The breadth of solution methodologies requires biomedical engineers to take a quantitative approach to system analysis in “traditional” engineering fields, while simultaneously employing a fundamental understanding of the relevant life sciences. Biomedical engineers should be prepared to design, build, test, and/or analyze biological systems, diagnostics, devices, and treatment modalities.

Core Courses

Additional Courses

Electrical Engineering

Electrical engineering leverages the fundamental principles surrounding electricity to advance today’s emerging technologies ranging from semiconductor devices to advanced communication networks, from self-powered sensors to electric cars, from wearable devices to cognitive medical imaging, and from autonomous vehicles to smart cities. Numerous subfields are found within this broad discipline, all of which are built on the foundations of mathematics and computer science, physical and life sciences, electromagnetics, electronics, and systems. The program is flexible, allowing the student either to focus on a single specialization, or to build an individualized curriculum from a combination of complementary subfields.

Core Courses

Electronic Systems

Signal Processing

Nano/microelectronics

Optics/Electromagnetics

Additional Courses

Electronic Systems

Signal Processing

Nano/microelectronics

Data Science

Mathematics

Energy Engineering

Energy is a major determinant of world events and quality of life. Energy engineering brings to bear the spectrum of engineering disciplines on challenges and opportunities involving energy, recognizing social, political, and economic contexts. This area of study aims to increase the efficiency of energy conversion, storage, transmission and utilization, to accelerate the transition to sustainable energy sources, and to improve access to and management of energy systems. Students are encouraged to develop depth in one or more technical areas along with a broad understanding of energy technologies, systems, challenges, and opportunities.

Core Courses

Additional Courses

Materials Science and Engineering

The study of materials science and engineering relates the properties of materials—chemical, electrical, magnetic, mechanical, optical—to their internal architecture or microstructure. In turn, structure is related to processing—solidification, thermal/mechanical treatment, vapor deposition etc.—and to the underlying thermodynamic "driving forces" and kinetics that cause changes in structure and hence in properties and behavior. Fundamental to the study are both qualitative and quantitative methods of microstructural analysis.

Core Courses

Additional Courses

Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineers apply principles of engineering to the design, analysis, and manufacture of machines ranging from power systems, industrial equipment, and vehicles to athletic equipment and medical devices. Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest engineering disciplines, and as such, mechanical engineering programs should include, but are not limited to, courses in mechanics, materials, dynamics, thermal and fluid systems, robotics, applied mathematics, systems and controls. 

Core Courses

Additional Courses