Teaching
Home | Research | Teaching | CV | Calendar | Links | Student Projects

Engineering Sciences 20 - Introduction to Scientific Computing

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College Spring '05, '06, '07, '08, '09, Fall '06, '07, '08

This course introduces concepts and techniques for creating computational solutions to problems in engineering and science. The essentials of computer programming are developed using the C and Matlab languages, with the goal of enabling the student to use the computer effectively in subsequent courses. Programming topics include problem decomposition, control structures, recursion, arrays and other data structures, file I/O, graphics, and code libraries. Applications will be drawn from numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, root finding, matrix operations, regression, searching and sorting, simulation, and data analysis. Good programming style and computational efficiency are emphasized. Although no previous programming experience is assumed, a significant time commitment is required.

Students planning to pursue the engineering sciences major are advised to take ENGINEERING SCIENCES 20. Students considering the computer science major or majors modified with computer science should take COMPUTER SCIENCE 5.

Prerequisites: MATHEMATICS 3 and prior or concurrent enrollment in MATHEMATICS 8.

further details


Engineering Sciences 91 - Numerical Methods in Computation

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College Fall '03, '04, '05, '06, '07, '08

Courtesy of David Murr

A study and analysis of important numerical and computational methods for solving engineering and scientific problems. The course will include methods for solving linear and nonlinear equations, doing polynomial interpolation, evaluating integrals, solving ordinary differential equations, and determining eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices. The student will be required to write and run computer programs.

Prerequisites: Computer Science 5 or 14 or Engineering Sciences 20. and Mathematics 23.

further details


Physics 48 - Basic Electronics for Physicists

Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College Summer 2001 and 2002

Physics 48 is an introduction to electronics for students who have had Physics 14 (or 16); in particular, second-year physics majors who are enrolled in Physics 41 are encouraged to take this course. The course is designed for students who wish to learn about analog and digital electronics.

The course begins with the fundamentals of linear lumped circuits using passive components, including node and loop analysis, Thevenin's theorem, and impulse and frequency response of AC circuits. Diodes, transistors, and operational amplifiers are introduced, and active circuits involving feedback are discussed. The basic components of digital electronics are introduced. Other topics to be addressed include: tranmission lines, noise, stability, and analog-to-digital conversion. A laboratory accompanies the course which allows the student to gain practical experience in building and testing the circuits discussed in lecture. An independent project is required in which the student will become acquainted with computer-aided layout of a printed circuit board and soldering.

Prerequisites: Physics 14 or 16, and Mathematics 23.

further details


Introduction to IDL

Starr Instructional Center Berry Library February 2005

This class covers the basics of the Interactive Data Language (IDL), a programming environment that offers all the power, adaptability, and programmability of high-level languages like FORTRAN, C, and C++, but also adds two essential capabilities for modern data analysis: interactivity and graphics bisplay. The class in intended for beginning IDL users and covers the basics of running IDL, performing basic calculations, IDL data types, working with multidimensional arrays, basic I/O, and a brief introduction to 2D plotting and mapping. This is a hands-on class that includes sample exercises. Attendees should have a familiarity with basic computer operations.

Prerequisite: Previous programming experience in FORTRAN, C, or Matlab is helpful.

Course Length: Two hours.

further details


Introduction to Matlab

Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College January 2004

This class covers the basics of Matlab, a programming environment that offers all the power, adaptability, and programmability of high-level languages like FORTRAN, C, and C++, but also adds two essential capabilities for modern data analysis: interactivity and graphics display. The class is intended for beginning matlab users and covers performing calculations at the command line, creating variables, working with matrices and matlab data types, creating script files, and basic 2D and 3D graphing. This is a hands-on class that includes many sample excercise.

Prerequisites: Attendees should have a familiarity with basic computer operations. Some prior knowledge of programming is helpful.

Course Length: Six hours.

further details


Contact Information