Dartmouth Engineer - The Magazine of Thayer School of EngineeringDartmouth Engineer - The Magazine of Thayer School of Engineering

Visuals: The Art of Science

Showing an investigator’s eye view of their research, graduate students recently revealed the beauty of materials they manipulate in the lab. Several of their images were displayed during the inauguration of Thayer’s Visionaries in Technology Distinguished Lecture Series in October, when Harvard chemistry professor George Whitesides, a pioneer in microfabrication and nanoscale self-assembly, spoke about simplicity as a component of invention.

See Professor Whitesides’ lecture:

Below are some of the images that students submitted to highlight the creativity and beauty of research.

The central portion of this image illustrates the linear wear depth of a metal femoral head from a failed hip replacement
THE HIP OF SAURON: The central portion of this image illustrates the linear wear depth of a metal femoral head from a failed hip replacement. It was generated through MATLAB analysis of 3D coordinate data obtained from a Zeiss Contura G2 CMM. Image by Ph.D. candidate Jay Vincelli.

Calcium carbonate crystal
JELLY FISH: Calcium carbonate crystal. SEM image false colored with a blue filter. Image by Ph.D. candidate Philipp Hunger.

Damage features on the articular surface of a polyethylene knee bearing
Damage features on the articular surface of a polyethylene knee bearing, imaged at 100x magnification using a Keyence light microscope. Image by Ph.D. candidate Steven Reinitz.

Serial damage features on the head of a metal on metal hip implant
Serial damage features on the head of a metal on metal hip implant imaged at 200x using a Keyence light microscope. Image by Ph.D. candidate Tanille Paniogue.

Long exposure image of Cerenkov emission and induced fluorescence from Fluorescein dissolving in water during irradiation from a therapeutic LINAC beam
Long exposure image of Čerenkov emission and induced fluorescence from Fluorescein dissolving in water during irradiation from a therapeutic LINAC beam. Image by Ph.D. candidate Adam Glaser.

Micrograph obtained in a dual beam focused ion beam system
THE DOOR OF OPPORTUNITY: Micrograph obtained in a dual beam focused ion beam system at a voltage of 10 kV. The alumina-chitosan composite wall was sectioned at an ion beam current of 50 pA and acceleration voltage of 30 kV, creating a doorway through which to view the inner structure. Image by Ph.D. candidate Amalie Donius.

For more photos, visit our Engineering as Art set on Flickr.

Categories: The Great Hall, Visuals

Tags: design, energy, engineering in medicine, research, students

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