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Thayer by Degrees

BE, MEM, MS, and PhD News

A Conversation with Assistant Professor Brenden Epps

MS Program, December 2012

Just a few months ago Brenden Epps was a postdoc at MIT. Now the first-time Assistant Professor at Thayer has returned to the Upper Valley Region—he visited in 2004 while hiking the Appalachian Trail—bringing a vast knowledge of fluid mechanics as it relates to wind and wave energy, which he is using to research aeroelastic modeling of offshore wind turbines. Epps took a few minutes to chat about his research and his experience since arriving in August.

Incubating an Eco-Business

MEM Program, December 2012

Residents in Upstate New York spend a higher percentage of their income on heating costs than any other region in the United States. Most can't afford to or just won't invest a mere $50 in small electrical upgrades that will improve efficiency, even if the LED light bulbs, power strips, or space heaters would pay for themselves in savings within just five months. Tristan Morris M.E.M.'13 went searching for a solution to this problem for his undergraduate engineering thesis at Cornell University and found what later became the basis for a startup, Cirquility, that he launched through the Tuck School of Business' Barris Incubator Program over the summer.

An Eye-Opening Discovery

BE Program, December 2012

Anyone who remembers waiting as a child for Magic Grow Dinosaurs to expand in water understands the gist of an invention by a team of recent B.E. graduates. While this capsule morphs into a dinosaur sponge in minutes, it takes months for the polyacrylamide gel also used in Expandable Hydrogel Sphere for Orbital Implantation to slowly expand the eye socket in patients with anophthalmia and microphthalmia, conditions of lacking an eyeball or having a small eyeball.

Visionaries in Technology: George Whitesides

PhD Program, December 2012

For the inaugural event of Thayer's Visionaries in Technology series, Harvard Professor of Chemistry Dr. George Whitesides discusses what he considers one of the world's toughest jobs: Leading the Office of Naval Research, which entails listening to endless grant proposals and deciding what projects deserve funding. Former ONR head Fred Saalfeld came up with a strategy, known as the Saalfeld criterion, says Whitesides: "He'd stop people after the first three minutes and say, 'Assume all these lies you've told me will work as well as you say. Assume I give you all the money you ask for and more. Then the question is who cares?' If they could answer the question, they'd get the money."

Interdisciplinary Bachelor of Engineering Program Attracts Top-Notch Students and Faculty

BE Program, September 2012

The opportunity to learn methods and insights from several engineering fields of study is what attracts so many stellar B.E. candidates to Dartmouth and is what leads about half of them to pursue an advanced degree.

Dartmouth M.S. Graduates in Engineering Bring Project Management and R&D Skills to Industry

MS Program, September 2012

Thayer School M.S. graduates who don't pursue a Ph.D. in engineering sciences often bring project management and research and development skills they've gained to technology-based industry jobs.

Dartmouth Ph.D. in Engineering Sciences Provides Both Depth and Breadth

PhD Program, September 2012

"Ph.D. students will often work with many aspects of a given project. Without specific disciplines, like mechanical or electrical engineering, students graduate with a degree in engineering sciences and a necessary breadth of skills." —Professor Alexander Hartov, director of Thayer School's M.S. and Ph.D. programs

Dartmouth’s M.E.M. Program Teaches Engineers the Business of Technology

MEM Program, September 2012

As companies make the shift to rely more on technology, Dartmouth's Master of Engineering Management (M.E.M.) program continues to thrive with record numbers of applications for the fall.

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